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Early Adolescent Friendship Selection Based on Externalizing Behavior: the Moderating Role of Pubertal Development. The SNARE Study
Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9097-0873
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 44, 1647-1657 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined friendship (de-)selection processes in early adolescence. Pubertal development was examined as a potential moderator. It was expected that pubertal development would be associated with an increased tendency for adolescents to select their friends based on their similarities in externalizing behavior engagement (i.e., delinquency, alcohol use, and tobacco use). Data were used from the first three waves of the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behaviorin Early adolescence) study (N= 1144; 50 % boys;Mage=12.7; SD= 0.47), including students who entered the first year of secondary school. The hypothesis was tested using Stochastic Actor-Based Modeling in SIENA. While taking the network structure into account, and controlling for peer influence effects, the results supported this hypothesis. Early adolescents with higher pubertal development were as likely as their peers to select friends based on similarity in externalizing behavior and especially likely to remain friends with peers who had a similar level of externalizing behavior, andthus break friendship ties with dissimilar friends in this respect. As early adolescents are actively engaged in reorganizing their social context, adolescents with a higher pubertal development are especially likely to lose friendships with peers who do not engage in externalizing behavior, thus losing an important source of adaptive social control (i.e.,friends who do not engage in externalizing behavior).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2016. Vol. 44, 1647-1657 p.
Keyword [en]
Alcohol use, Delinquency, Pubertal development, Social network analysis, SIENA, Tobacco use
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142559DOI: 10.1007/s10802-016-0134-zISI: 000386116700016PubMedID: 26897629Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84958754696OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-142559DiVA: diva2:1153808
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Steglich, Christian

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