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Biocompatible Circuits for Human–Machine Interfacing
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (Laboratory of Organic Electronics)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0302-226X
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (Laboratory of Organic Electronics)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2799-3490
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (Laboratory of Organic Electronics)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5154-0291
2017 (English)In: Green Materials for Electronics / [ed] Mihai Irimia-Vladu, Eric D. Głowacki, Niyazi Sariciftci, Siegfried Bauer, Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2017, p. 91-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Conventional electronic devices have evolved from the first transistors introduced in the 1940s to integrated circuits and today's modern (CMOS) computer chips fabricated on silicon wafers using photolithography. This chapter reviews such iontronic devices for signal translation and their application in bioelectronics. It begins with a brief description of the ion transport mechanisms that lay the conceptual groundwork for this type of iontronic devices. The chapter presents various iontronic devices aimed at bioelectronic applications. It outlines the future possible developments of iontronics for human-machine interfacing. The physical interface between electronic devices and biological tissues is of particular interest, as this interface bridges the gap between artificial, humanmade technologies and biological "circuits". Ion-conducting diodes and transistors can be used to build circuits for modulation of ion flow, with the possibility of mimicking the dynamic and nonlinear processes occurring in the body.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2017. p. 91-118
National Category
Other Materials Engineering Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143173DOI: 10.1002/9783527692958.ch3ISBN: 9783527338658 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143173DiVA, id: diva2:1158970
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06

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CiteExportLink to record
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