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Vessel packaging effect in laser speckle contrast imaging and laser Doppler imaging
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Perimed AB, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3454-6576
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6385-6760
2017 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 22, no 10, 106005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Laser speckle-based techniques are frequently used to assess microcirculatory blood flow. Perfusion estimates are calculated either by analyzing the speckle fluctuations over time as in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), or by analyzing the speckle contrast as in laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). The perfusion estimates depend on the amount of blood and its speed distribution. However, the perfusion estimates are commonly given in arbitrary units as they are nonlinear and depend on the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the optical properties in the tissue under investigation. We describe how the spatial confinement of blood to vessels, called the vessel packaging effect, can be modeled in LDF and LSCI, which affect the Doppler power spectra and speckle contrast, and the underlying bio-optical mechanisms for these effects. As an example, the perfusion estimate is reduced by 25% for LDF and often more than 50% for LSCI when blood is located in vessels with an average diameter of 40 aem, instead of being homogeneously distributed within the tissue. This significant effect can be compensated for only with knowledge of the average diameter of the vessels in the tissue. (C) The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPIE-SOC PHOTO-OPTICAL INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERS , 2017. Vol. 22, no 10, 106005
Keyword [en]
microcirculation; blood flow; Monte Carlo simulations; modeling
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143096DOI: 10.1117/1.JBO.22.10.106005ISI: 000414251000018PubMedID: 29019179OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143096DiVA: diva2:1159400
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2014-6141]; Swedens innovation agency VINNOVA via the program MedTech4Health [2016-02211]

Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2017-11-22

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