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Pediatric norovirus GII.4 infections in Nicaragua, 1999-2015
National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
University of N Carolina, NC USA.
University of N Carolina, NC USA.
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2017 (English)In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, ISSN 1567-1348, E-ISSN 1567-7257, Vol. 55, 305-312 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Investigate clinical and epidemiological factors of pediatric GII.4 norovirus infections in children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in Nicaragua between 1999 and 2015. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed laboratory and epidemiologic data from 1,790 children amp;lt;= 7 years with AGE from 6 hospitals in Nicaragua (n = 538), and 3 community clinics (n = 919) and households (n = 333) in Leon, between 1999 and 2015. Moreover, asymptomatic children from community clinics (n = 162) and households (n = 105) were enrolled. Norovirus was detected by real-time PCR and genotyped by sequencing the N-terminal and shell region of the capsid gene. Results: Norovirus was found in 19% (n = 338) and 12% (n = 32) of children with and without AGE, respectively. In total, 20 genotypes including a tentatively new genotype were detected. Among children with AGE, the most common genotypes were GII.4 (53%), GII.14 (7%), GII.3 (6%) and GI.3 (6%). In contrast, only one (1.4%) GII.4 was found in asymptomatic children. The prevalence of GII.4 infections was significantly higher in children between 7 and 12 months of age. The prevalence of GII.4 was lowest in households (38%), followed by community clinics (50%) and hospitals (75%). Several different GII.4 variants were detected and their emergence followed the global temporal trend. Conclusions: Overall our study found the predominance of pediatric GII.4 norovirus infections in Nicaragua mostly occurring in children between 7 and 12 months of age, implicating GII.4 as the main norovirus vaccine target.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2017. Vol. 55, 305-312 p.
Keyword [en]
Norovirus; Nicaragua; GII.4; Pediatric; Gastroenteritis; Asymptomatic; Community
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143244DOI: 10.1016/j.meegid.2017.10.001ISI: 000414866200042PubMedID: 28982545OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143244DiVA: diva2:1160431
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [dnr-348-2011-7420]; Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health [5K01TW008401-04]; University of North Carolina, Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases

Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-11-27

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