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Innovation in the Arts: Lessons from the Creation of Dalhalla
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. (Marknadsföring)ORCID iD: per.frankelius@liu.se
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Music Business Research, ISSN 2227-5789, Vol. 6, no 2, 6-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Innovation is crucial for progress in many parts of society including the arts. A lot of innovation theories have also emerged in the literature, however most of them focus on business firms and technology. Moreover, the term, innovation, is not always defined. This article attempts to deepen the understanding of innovation, both at a general and specific level, although its focus is arenas for classical music. Three research questions were formulated: 1) What was the original meaning of the innovation concept? 2) What shape can innovation have in the area of opera and classical music arenas? 3) Which barriers as well as stimulating factors affect innovation processes in the context of novel arena creations?

 

The theoretical basis is a selected spectrum of innovation theories derived from an analysis of the international innovation literature. The first perspective is the diffusion theory, originated by Gabriel Tarde and followed up by Hirsh Zvi Griliches, Bryce Ryan, Neal Gross and Everett Rogers. The second perspective, termed the Great-Man theory, is represented by Friedrich Nietzsche, Donald A. Schon, Robert A. Burgelman and Diana L. Day.The third perspective is called collective determinism, and put forward by sociologists such as William F. Ogburn and Seabury Colum Gilfillan. The fourth perspective is represented by Joseph Schumpeter. Focus here is innovation in economic development. The fifth perspective is about innovation processes and formulated by authors such as Kenneth Arrow, Arnold Cooper, Gordon Foxall, Andrew van de Ven, Robert G. Cooper, Steven C. Wheelwright and Kim B. Clark. The sixth perspective consists of evolutionary theories and is represented by not least Richard Nelson and Sidney Winter. The final perspective is the open innovation and key players here are Eric von Hippel, Henry Chesbrough, and Clayton M. Christensen.

 

Besides these innovation perspectives an etymological study of innovation is included, and this theoretical platform – the theories and the etymology – is then encountered with a case study on how Margareta Dellefors created Dalhalla in Sweden, an opera and classical music arena. Because of the combination of nature and art, Dalhalla gained world fame. The case study opens Schumpeter's black box "creative destruction" and it deepens the understanding of barriers and stimulating factors. The analysis ends up in a definition of innovation and a new model of innovation, called the innovation cube. This model positions phenomena that are “candidates of innovations” by means of the three dimensions originality, impact and time. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vienna, 2017. Vol. 6, no 2, 6-40 p.
Keyword [en]
Innovation, Fundraising, Music marketing, Regional development, Destinations, Innovation concept, Birgit Nilsson, Reframing, Entrepreneurship, Kainotomina, Innovation barriers, Creative destruction, New combinations, Opera scenes, Classical music arenas
Keyword [it]
Innovazione, Raccolta fondi, Marketing musicale, Sviluppo regionale, Destinazioni, Concetto di innovazione, Birgit Nilsson, Reframing, Imprenditorialità, Kainotomina, Barriere dell'innovazione, Distruzione creativa, Nuove combinazioni, Scene d'opera, Arene di musica classica
Keyword [hi]
नवाचार, धन उगाहने, संगीत विपणन, क्षेत्रीय विकास, स्थलों, अभिनव अवधारणा, बिर्जिट निल्सन, रिफ्रमिंग, उद्यमिता, कैनोोटोमीना, अभिनव बाधाएं, क्रिएटिव विनाश, नए संयोजन, ओपेरा दृश्य, शास्त्रीय संगीत अखाड़ा
Keyword [zh]
創新,籌款,音樂營銷,區域發展,旅遊目的地,創新理念,Birgit Nilsson,Reframing,Entrepreneurship,Kainotomina,創新壁壘,創造性破壞,新組合,歌劇場面,古典音樂舞台
Keyword [fr]
Innovation, Collecte de fonds, Marketing musical, Développement régional, Destinations, Concept d'innovation, Birgit Nilsson, Recadrage, Entrepreneuriat, Kainotomina, Barrières de l'innovation, Destruction créative, Nouvelles combinaisons, Scènes d'opéra, Arènes musicales classiques
Keyword [de]
Innovation, Fundraising, Musikmarketing, Regionalentwicklung, Destinationen, Innovationskonzept, Birgit Nilsson, Reframing, Unternehmertum, Kainotomina, Innovationsbarrieren, Kreative Zerstörung, Neue Kombinationen, Opernszenen, Klassische Musikarenen
Keyword [es]
Innovación, Recaudación de fondos, Marketing de música, Desarrollo regional, Destinos, Concepto de innovación, Birgit Nilsson, Reencuadre, Emprendimiento, Kainotomina, Barreras de innovación, Destrucción creativa, Nuevas combinaciones, Escenas de ópera, Pabellones de música clásica
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143298OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143298DiVA: diva2:1162042
Note

Innovation is crucial for progress in many parts of society including the arts. A lot of innovation theories have also emerged in the literature, however most of them focus on business firms and technology. Moreover, the term, innovation, is not always defined. This article attempts to deepen the understanding of innovation, both at a general and specific level, although its focus is arenas for classical music. Three research questions were formulated: 1) What was the original meaning of the innovation concept? 2) What shape can innovation have in the area of opera and classical music arenas? 3) Which barriers as well as stimulating factors affect innovation processes in the context of novel arena creations? The theoretical basis is a selected spectrum of innovation theories derived from an analysis of the international innovation literature. The first perspective is the diffusion theory, originated by Gabriel Tarde and followed up by Hirsh Zvi Griliches, Bryce Ryan, Neal Gross and Everett Rogers. The second perspective, termed the Great-Man theory, is represented by Friedrich Nietzsche, Donald A. Schon, Robert A. Burgelman and Diana L. Day.The third perspective is called collective determinism, and put forward by sociologists such as William F. Ogburn and Seabury Colum Gilfillan. The fourth perspective is represented by Joseph Schumpeter. Focus here is innovation in economic development. The fifth perspective is about innovation processes and formulated by authors such as Kenneth Arrow, Arnold Cooper, Gordon Foxall, Andrew van de Ven, Robert G. Cooper, Steven C. Wheelwright and Kim B. Clark. The sixth perspective consists of evolutionary theories and is represented by not least Richard Nelson and Sidney Winter. The final perspective is the open innovation and key players here are Eric von Hippel, Henry Chesbrough, and Clayton M. Christensen. Besides these innovation perspectives an etymological study of innovation is included, and this theoretical platform – the theories and the etymology – is then encountered with a case study on how Margareta Dellefors created Dalhalla in Sweden, an opera and classical music arena. Because of the combination of nature and art, Dalhalla gained world fame. The case study opens Schumpeter's black box "creative destruction" and it deepens the understanding of barriers and stimulating factors. The analysis ends up in a definition of innovation and a new model of innovation, called the innovation cube. This model positions phenomena that are “candidates of innovations” by means of the three dimensions originality, impact and time.

Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-06

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