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The mother-offspring dyad: microbial transmission, immune interactions and allergy development
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. World University of Network, Australia.
2017 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 282, no 6, p. 484-495Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The increasing prevalence of allergy in affluent countries may be caused by reduced intensity and diversity of microbial stimulation, resulting in abnormal postnatal immune maturation. Most studies investigating the underlying immunomodulatory mechanisms have focused on postnatal microbial exposure, for example demonstrating that the gut microbiota differs in composition and diversity during the first months of life in children who later do or do not develop allergic disease. However, it is also becoming increasingly evident that the maternal microbial environment during pregnancy is important in childhood immune programming, and the first microbial encounters may occur already in utero. During pregnancy, there is a close immunological interaction between the mother and her offspring, which provides important opportunities for the maternal microbial environment to influence the immune development of the child. In support of this theory, combined pre- and postnatal supplementations seem to be crucial for the preventive effect of probiotics on infant eczema. Here, the influence of microbial and immune interactions within the mother-offspring dyad on childhood allergy development will be discussed. In addition, how perinatal transmission of microbes and immunomodulatory factors from mother to offspring may shape appropriate immune maturation during infancy and beyond, potentially via epigenetic mechanisms, will be examined. Deeper understanding of these interactions between the maternal and offspring microbiome and immunity is needed to identify efficacious preventive measures to combat the allergy epidemic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2017. Vol. 282, no 6, p. 484-495
Keyword [en]
allergy; immune development; infancy; maternal influences; microbiota; pregnancy
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143623DOI: 10.1111/joim.12652ISI: 000415928700002PubMedID: 28727206OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143623DiVA: diva2:1165589
Note

Funding Agencies|Nutricia/Danone

Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-01-18

Open Access in DiVA

The full text will be freely available from 2018-08-14 09:58
Available from 2018-08-14 09:58

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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