liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Visualization and mesoscopic simulation in systems biology
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)Alternative title
Visualisierung und mesoskopische Simulation in der Systembiologie (German)
Abstract [en]

Biological cells appear everywhere on earth. They might live on their own as unicellular organism, like bacteria, or might form complex organisms consisting of several thousands or millions of cells. Despite their small size of only a few micrometers, they are complex little miracles. A better understanding of the internal mechanisms and interplays within a single cell is the key to the understanding of life. In the context of this thesis, the mechanism of cellular signal transduction, i.e. relaying a signal from outside the cell by different means of transport toward its target inside the cell, is employed. Understanding and adjusting parts of the cellular signaling mechanism will eventually lead to the design of new drugs with less or even without any side-effects. Besides experiments, understanding can also be achieved by numerical simulations of cellular behavior. This is where systems biology closely relates and depends on recent research results in computer science in order to deal with the modeling, the simulation, and the analysis of the computational results.

Since a single cell can consist of billions of molecules, the simulation of intracellular processes requires a simplifiedmodel. Typically, mesoscopic models are used containing only parts that are believed to be necessary for the processes. The simulation domain has to be three dimensional to consider the spatial, possibly asymmetric, intracellular architecture filled with individual particles representing signaling molecules. In contrast to continuous models defined by systems of partial differential equations, a particle-based model allows tracking individual molecules moving through the cell. This particle-based approach, however, demands for a higher computational effort than, e.g., non-spatial models that can be solved with ordinary differential equations. The overall process of signal propagation usually requires between minutes and hours to complete, but the movement of molecules and the interactions between them have to be computed in the range of microseconds. Hence, the computation of thousands of consecutive time steps is necessary, requiring several hours or even days of computational time for a sequential simulation. The need for several simulation runs with different parameter settings, a higher level of detail including more particles, or a generally more precise simulation, i.e. smaller time steps, demands for short execution times of the simulation. To speed up the simulation, the parallel hardware of current central processing units (CPUs) and graphics processing units (GPUs) can be employed. The parallelization of interacting particles, however, is non-trivial and requires special care when utilizing modern manycore architectures like the GPU. Finally, the resulting data has to be analyzed by domain experts and, therefore, has to be represented in meaningful ways. Typical prevalent analysis methods include the aggregation of the data in tables or simple 2D graph plots, sometimes 3D plots for continuous data. Despite the fact that techniques for the interactive visualization of data in 3D are well-known, so far none of the methods have been applied to the biological context of single cell models and specialized visualizations fitted to the experts’ need are missing. Another issue is the hardware available to the domain experts that can be used for the task of visualizing the increasing amount of time-dependent data resulting from simulations. Exa-scale visualization still seems to be a long way off, but even the data sets available today are pushing the rendering capability of current graphics hardware to its limits. However, it is important that the visualization keeps up with the simulations to ensure that domain experts can still analyze their data sets. To deal with the massive amount of data to come, compute clusters will be necessary with specialized hardware dedicated to data visualization. It is, thus, important, to develop visualization algorithms for this dedicated hardware, which is currently available as GPU.

In this thesis, the computational power of recent many-core architectures (CPUs as well as GPUs) is harnessed for both the simulation and the visualizations. Novel parallel algorithms are introduced to parallelize the spatio-temporal, mesoscopic particle simulation to fit the architectures of CPU and GPU in a similar way, easing the portability between both. Besides molecular diffusion, the simulation considers extracellular effects on the signal propagation as well as the import of molecules into the nucleus and a dynamic cytoskeleton. An extensive comparison between different configurations is performed leading to the conclusion that the usage of GPUs is not always beneficial. Depending on the simulation setup, however, the GPU implementation can be up to ten times faster than the parallel simulation on the CPU. For the visual data analysis, novel interactive visualization techniques were developed to visualize the 3D simulation results. Existing glyph-based approaches are combined in a new way facilitating the visualization of the individual molecules in the interior of the cell as well as their trajectories. A novel implementation of the depth of field effect, as known from photography, combined with additional depth cues and coloring aid the visual perception and reduce visual clutter. To obtain a continuous signal distribution from the discrete particles, techniques known from volume rendering are employed. The visualization of the underlying atomic structures provides new detailed insights and can be used for educational purposes besides showing the original data. The proposed technique allows for the interactive visualization of data sets containing several billion atoms per time step. A microscope-like visualization allows for the first time to generate images of synthetic data similar to images obtained in wet lab experiments. The simulation and the visualizations are merged into a prototypical framework, thereby supporting the domain expert during the different stages of model development, i.e. design, parallel simulation, and analysis.

Although the proposed methods for both simulation and visualization were developed with the study of single-cell signal transduction processes in mind, they are also applicable to models consisting of several cells and other particle-based scenarios. Examples in this thesis include the diffusion of drugs into a tumor, the detection of protein cavities, and molecular dynamics data from laser ablation simulations, among others.

Abstract [de]

Zellen kommen auf der Erde uberall vor. Sie leben entweder auf sich selbst gestellt als Einzeller, wie beispielsweise Bakterien, oder bilden zusammen mit tausenden von Zellen hochkomplexe Organismen. Trotz ihrer Grose von nur wenigen Mikrometern sind sie dennoch sehr komplexe Wunderwerke. Ein besseres Verstandnis der komplizierten, internen Mechanismen und der Wechselwirkungen innerhalb einer einzelnen Zelle kann als Voraussetzung gesehen werden, um das Leben an sich verstehen zu konnen. Als ein Beitrag dazu beschaftigt sich diese Dissertation mit dem Mechanismus der zellularen Signaltransduktion. Hierbei wird ein Signal, das seinen Ursprung auserhalb der Zelle hat, uber verschiedene Transportwege zu seinem Ziel, dem Zellkern, ubermittelt. Das Verstehen und Anpassen von Teilen dieses Signalubertragungsmechanismus kann letztendlich zur Entwicklung von neuen Medikamenten beitragen, die nur geringe oder keine Nebenwirkungen aufweisen. Neben Experimenten im Labor konnen auch numerische Simulationen von zellularem Verhalten genutzt werden, um neue Einsichten und ein besseres Verstandnis zu gewinnen. Solche Simulationen setzen jedoch voraus, dass theoretische Modelle entworfen und ausgewertet werden. An diesem Punkt wird klar, dass die Systembiologie von aktuellen Forschungsergebnissen der Informatik profitiert und auch abhangig ist, um die Modellierung, die Simulation und die Analyse der berechneten Ergebnisse zu bewaltigen.

Die Simulation intrazellularer Prozesse erfordert heutzutage noch ein vereinfachtes, mesoskopisches Zellmodell, da eine einzelne Zelle aus mehreren Milliarden Atomen bestehen kann. Um die raumliche, moglicherweise auch asymmetrische Architektur der Zelle zu berucksichtigen, mussen sowohl das Simulationsgebiet als auch die Simulation dreidimensional sein. Eine partikelbasierte Simulation ermoglicht im Gegensatz zu kontinuierlichen Modellen – gegeben durch ein System von partiellen Differentialgleichungen – das Verfolgen einzelner Partikel. Diese Partikel stellen Signalmolekule auf ihrem Weg durch die Zelle dar. Solche partikelbasierten Simulationen erfordern allerdings deutlich mehr Berechnungsaufwand als beispielsweise nicht-raumliche Modelle, die mittels gewohnlicher Differentialgleichungen gelost werden konnen. Der gesamte Prozess einer Signalubertragung innerhalb der Zelle benotigt in der Realitat zwischen wenigen Minuten und mehreren Stunden. Die Bewegungen der Molekule sowie die Interaktionen zwischen ihnen mussen jedoch mit einer Zeitauflosung von wenigen Mikrosekunden berucksichtigt werden. Daraus folgt, dass die Auswertung von tausenden aufeinanderfolgenden Zeitschritten notwendig ist, deren Berechnung mit einer sequentiellen Simulation einige Stunden oder sogar Tage benotigen wurde. Wunschenswert sind kurze Simulationszeiten, die oft auch notwendig sind – insbesondere wenn verschiedene Parametersatze analysiert, mehr Details simuliert oder einfach die Simulationen zeitlich feiner aufgelost werden sollen. Um die Simulationen zu beschleunigen, kann die parallele Hardware heutiger Hauptprozessoren (CPUs) und Grafikprozessoren (GPUs) eingesetzt werden. Die Parallelisierung von interagierenden Partikeln ist jedoch nicht trivial und erfordert daher spezielle Mittel und Wege, wenn moderne Mehrkernprozessoren – wie beispielsweise GPUs – verwendet werden. Im Anschluss an die Simulation mussen die resultierenden Daten von Experten analysiert werden und sollten daher moglichst aussagekraftig dargestellt werden. Zu den gangigen Analyseverfahren zahlt neben der Ansammlung der Daten in Tabellen auch die Darstellung in einfachen 2D-Liniendiagrammen und fur kontinuierliche Daten daruber hinaus als dreidimensionale Graphen. Obwohl Techniken fur die interaktive Visualisierung von 3D-Daten bekannt sind, wurde bislang keine der Methoden im Kontext eines biologischen Zellmodells eingesetzt. Speziell an die Anspruche der Experten angepasste Visualisierungen fehlen. Ein weiteres Problem stellt die den Experten zur Verfugung stehende Hardware dar, welche fur die Visualisierung der stets zunehmenden Menge an zeitabhangigen Simulationsdaten verwendet werden kann. Die Visualisierungen im Exa-Bereich scheinen noch weit in der Zukunft zu liegen, aber selbst fur heutzutage verfugbare Datensatze stosen aktuelle Grafikkarten immer ofter an die Grenzen der maximalen Darstellungsleistung. Es ist jedoch von groser Bedeutung, dass die Visualisierung mit der Entwicklung der Simulationen Schritt halt, um sicherzustellen, dass Experten ihre Daten weiterhin analysieren konnen. Um die zukunftigen enormen Datenmengen zu bewaltigen, wird der Einsatz von Compute Clusters notwendig sein, die uber eine spezialisierte Hardware fur die Datenvisualisierung verfugen. Daher ist die Entwicklung von Visualisierungsalgorithmen fur so eine spezialisierte Hardware wichtig, die heute in Form von GPUs bereits verfugbar ist.

In dieser Dissertation wird die Rechenleistung der jungsten Architekturen von Mehrkernprozessoren (sowohl CPUs als auch GPUs) fur die Simulation wie auch fur die Visualisierung eingesetzt. Neue parallele Algorithmen werden vorgestellt, die zur Parallelisierung der raumlich-zeitlichen, mesoskopischen Partikelsimulation auf CPU und GPU in ahnlicher Weise eingesetzt werden konnen, um die Portabilitat zwischen beiden Architekturen zu vereinfachen. Neben der molekularen Diffusion werden in der Simulation auch folgende Mechanismen berucksichtigt: extrazellulare Effekte auf die Signalubertragung, Import von Molekulen in den Zellkern und dynamisches Zellskelett. Ein ausfuhrlicher Vergleich, durchgefuhrt fur verschiedene Simulationskonfigurationen, fuhrt zu dem Schluss, dass die Verwendung der GPU nicht in allen Fallen nutzbringend ist. In Abhangigkeit von den Simulationsparametern kann die GPU-Implementierung in Einzelfallen jedoch bis zu zehn Mal schneller sein als die parallele Simulation auf der CPU. Fur die visuelle Datenanalyse der 3D-Simulationsergebnisse wurden neue interaktive Visualisierungstechniken entwickelt. Bereits existierende, glyphbasierte Ansatze wurden in einer neuenWeise kombiniert, um die Visualisierung der individuellen Molekule und ihre Trajektorien im Inneren der Zelle zu ermoglichen. Der Effekt der Scharfentiefe, wie er auch in der Fotografie bekannt ist, kann mit zusatzlichen Tiefenhinweisen und Einfarbungen kombiniert werden, um die visuelle Wahrnehmung zu unterstutzen und die Uberreizung durch zuviele dargestellte Elemente zu reduzieren. Techniken fur die Darstellung von Volumendaten werden in leicht abgewandelter Form zur Visualisierung einer kontinuierlichen Signalverteilung eingesetzt, die aus den diskreten Partikeln berechnet wird. Die Visualisierung der Atomstrukturen der einzelnen Molekule bietet neue Einsichten in das zellulare Innenleben und kann neben der Darstellung der ursprunglichen Daten auch fur padagogische Zwecke eingesetzt werden. Der in dieser Arbeit vorgestellte Ansatz ermoglicht die interaktive Visualisierung von Datensatzen, die aus mehreren Milliarden Atomen pro Zeitschritt bestehen. Eine mikroskop-ahnliche Visualisierung erlaubt zum ersten Mal die Generierung von Bildern aus synthetischen Daten, die denen aus Laborversuchen nur wenig nachstehen. Die Simulation und die verschiedenen Visualisierungen wurden in einem prototypischen System vereinigt. Dieses System ist in der Lage, den Experten im Verlauf der verschiedenen Stufen der Modellentwicklung – d.h. Entwurf, parallele Simulation und Analyse – zu unterstutzen.

Obwohl die vorgestellten Simulations- und Visualisierungsmethoden mit dem Ziel, die Signalubertragungsprozesse innerhalb einer Zelle zu studieren, entwickelt wurden, konnen sie auch auf Modelle, bestehend aus mehreren Zellen, und andere partikelbasierten Szenarien angewendet werden. Die Diffusion von Medikamenten in Tumoren, die Erkennung von Hohlraumen in Proteinen und die Darstellung von Molekulardynamikdaten (MD) aus Laserablationssimulationen sind nur einige Beispiele, die in dieser Arbeit angefuhrt werden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stuttgart: OPUS University of Stuttgart , 2013. , p. 180
Series
13 Zentrale Universitätseinrichtungen
Keywords [en]
Scientific Visualization, GPGPU, Simulation, Systems Biology, Model Development, Signal Transduction
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143709DOI: 10.18419/opus-6430OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143709DiVA, id: diva2:1166297
Public defence
2013-04-29, 00:00 (English)
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2018-02-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Falk, Martin
Computer Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 34 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf