liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The implementation of guided Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder in a routine-care setting: effectiveness and implementation efforts
eMeistring, Bjørgvin DPS, Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Faculty of Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Research Department, Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Centre for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. (Internet, health and clinical psychology research group)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4753-6745
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 62-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Panic disorder is a common mental disorder. Guided Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (Guided Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT)) is a promising approach to reach more people in need of help. In the present effectiveness study, we investigated the outcome of guided ICBT for panic disorder after implementation in routine care. A total of 124 patients were included in the study, of which 114 started the treatment. Large within-group effect sizes were observed on the primary panic disorder symptoms (post-treatment: d = 1.24; 6-month follow-up: d = 1.39) and moderate and large effects on secondary panic disorder symptoms and depressive symptoms at post-treatment and follow-up (d = .55-1.13). More than half (56.1%) of the patients who started treatment recovered or improved at post-treatment. Among treatment takers (completed at least five of the nine modules), 69.9% recovered or improved. The effectiveness reported in the present trial is in line with previous effectiveness and efficacy trials of guided ICBT for panic disorder. This provides additional support for guided ICBT as a treatment alternative in routine care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018. Vol. 47, no 1, p. 62-75
Keyword [en]
Panic disorder, cognitive behavioural therapy, effectiveness, guided Internet-based treatment, implementation
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143853DOI: 10.1080/16506073.2017.1348389ISI: 000419952900005PubMedID: 28714775Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85024385408OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143853DiVA, id: diva2:1168768
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Andersson, Gerhard

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, Gerhard
By organisation
PsychologyFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
Applied Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 76 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf