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Parents in adult psychiatric care and their children: a call for more interagency collaboration with social services and child and adolescent psychiatry
Malmö University, Sweden.
Malmö University, Sweden.
Lund University, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Lund University, Sweden.
2018 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A parental mental illness affects all family members and should warrant a need for support.Aim: To investigate the extent to which psychiatric patients with underage children are the recipients of child-focused interventions and involved in interagency collaboration.Methods: Data were retrieved from a psychiatric services medical record database consisting of data regarding 29,972 individuals in southern Sweden and indicating the patients main diagnoses, comorbidity, children below the age of 18, and child-focused interventions.Results: Among the patients surveyed, 12.9% had registered underage children. One-fourth of the patients received child-focused interventions from adult psychiatry, and out of these 30.7% were involved in interagency collaboration as compared to 7.7% without child-focused interventions. Overall, collaboration with child and adolescent psychiatric services was low for all main diagnoses. If a patient received child-focused interventions from psychiatric services, the likelihood of being involved in interagency collaboration was five times greater as compared to patients receiving no child-focused intervention when controlled for gender, main diagnosis, and inpatient care.Conclusions: Psychiatric services play a significant role in identifying the need for and initiating child-focused interventions in families with a parental mental illness, and need to develop and support strategies to enhance interagency collaboration with other welfare services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD , 2018. Vol. 72, no 1, p. 31-38
Keywords [en]
Parental mental illness; children; child-focused intervention; interagency collaboration; psychiatric services
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143889DOI: 10.1080/08039488.2017.1377287ISI: 000417846400005PubMedID: 28933586OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143889DiVA, id: diva2:1170079
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2018-01-02

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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