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Similarities and differences in the functions of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and sex as self-injury (SASI)
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
Department of Psychology, IKV, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Suicide and Life-threatening Behaviour, ISSN 0363-0234, E-ISSN 1943-278XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Differences and similarities were studied in the functions of two different self-injurious behaviors (SIB): nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and sex as self-injury (SASI). Based on type of SIB reported, adolescents were classified in one of three groups: NSSI only (n = 910), SASI only (n = 41), and both NSSI and SASI (n = 76). There was support for functional equivalence in the two forms of SIB, with automatic functions being most commonly endorsed in all three groups. There were also functional differences, with adolescents in the SASI only group reporting more social influence functions than those with NSSI only. Adolescents reporting both NSSI and SASI endorsed the highest number of functions for both behaviors. Clinical implications are discussed, emphasizing the need for emotion regulation skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017.
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144486DOI: 10.1111/sltb.12417PubMedID: 29073344Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85032291097OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-144486DiVA, id: diva2:1177027
Available from: 2018-01-24 Created: 2018-01-24 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved

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The full text will be freely available from 2019-10-26 15:38
Available from 2019-10-26 15:38

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Jonsson, LindaSvedin, Carl GöranPribe, GiselaFredlund, CeciliaWadsby, MarieZetterqvist, Maria

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Jonsson, LindaSvedin, Carl GöranPribe, GiselaFredlund, CeciliaWadsby, MarieZetterqvist, Maria
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BarnafridFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in LinköpingCenter for Social and Affective Neuroscience
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Journal of Suicide and Life-threatening Behaviour
Psychiatry

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