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Marrow compartment contribution to cortical defect healing
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0677-9265
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2018 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 119-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose - Healing of shaft fractures is commonly described as regards external callus. We wanted to clarify the role of the bone marrow compartment in the healing of stable shaft fractures. Patients and methods - A longitudinal furrow was milled along the longitudinal axis of the femoral shaft in mice. The exposed bone marrow under the furrow was scooped out. The mice were then randomized to no further treatment, or to receiving 2 silicone plugs in the medullary canal distal and proximal to the defect. The plugs isolated the remaining marrow from contact with the defect. Results were studied with histology and flow cytometry. Results - Without silicone plugs, the marrow defect was filled with new bone marrow-like tissue by day 5, and new bone was seen already on day 10. The new bone was seen only at the level of the cortical injury, where it seemed to form simultaneously in the entire region of the removed cortex. The new bone seemed not to invade the marrow compartment, and there was a sharp edge between new bone and marrow. The regenerated marrow was similar to uninjured marrow, but contained considerably more cells. In the specimens with plugs, the marrow compartment was either filled with loose scar tissue, or empty, and there was only minimal bone formation, mainly located around the edges of the cortical injury. Interpretation - Marrow regeneration in the defect seemed to be a prerequisite for normal cortical healing. Shaft fracture treatment should perhaps pay more attention to the local bone marrow.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD , 2018. Vol. 89, no 1, p. 119-123
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145120DOI: 10.1080/17453674.2017.1382280ISI: 000423474000020PubMedID: 28946782OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-145120DiVA, id: diva2:1183670
Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2019-05-27
In thesis
1. Healing Processes in Cancellous Bone
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healing Processes in Cancellous Bone
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Most of what is known about the biological response during fracture healing comes from numerous animal studies with shaft fractures in the long bone. However, most patients suffer from fractures closer to the ends of the long bones, in the hip, or in the vertebrae. These types of fractures mainly involve cancellous bone, while shaft fractures concern cortical bone. Compared to cortical bone whose structure is dense and compact, cancellous bone is of spongy and porous structure. A growing number of studies point towards that cortical and cancellous bone heal differently. To even this imbalance in knowledge between these two types of bone tissue, further studies in cancellous bone are justified.

In this thesis we delved into the quiet unknown processes behind cancellous bone healing.

In the first study we characterized and compared two models for cancellous bone healing in mice and rats: the first model can be used to analyze the morphology and morphometry of the regenerating bone; the second model can measure the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. The two models correspond in their developing patterns during the first week before they diverge. This suggests that these models can be utilized together to evaluate the initial healing in cancellous bone. Furthermore, we saw in the drill hole model that the bone formation is strictly restricted to the traumatized region, with a distinct interface to the adjacent uninjured tissue.

The second study characterized the cellular response during the initial healing phase in cancellous bone. The focus was to follow the spatial location of inflammatory and osteogenic cells over time in a cancellous bone injury. In contrast to shaft fractures (cortical bone), where healing is described as sequential events where inflammatory cells are the first to arrive to the trauma before osteogenic cells are recruited and initiate healing, we could see how inflammatory and osteogenic cells appeared early, simultaneously after a cancellous bone injury. This study showed that cancellous bone differs from how fracture healing is normally described.

In the third study we explored the role of a subpopulation of lymphocytes (CD8 positive cells), earlier studied in shaft fractures. We wanted to see how their absence would affect the healing in a cancellous bone injury. Without CD8+ cells, cancellous bone healing was impaired as expressed via poorer mechanical properties of the regenerated bone tissue.

The fourth and last study issued the influence of uninjured bone marrow on cortical bone healing. We developed a cortical defect model which blocked uninjured marrow from reaching the defect. Without the presence of marrow, the cortical defects ability to regenerate was significantly impaired. This implies that the marrow is important for cortical bone healing.

In conclusion, cancellous bone healing is different from its cortical counterpart and the general perception of fracture healing. We have briefly discerned healing mechanisms in cancellous bone that might be of clinical importance: the restricted cancellous bone formation is something to take into consideration when performing arthrodeses; and importance of marrow in skeletal defects (e.g. pseudarthroses). With this thesis, we hope to promote that further investigating on cancellous bone healing is necessary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018. p. 24
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1652
National Category
Orthopaedics Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152349 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-152349 (DOI)9789176851777 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-12-06, Belladonna, Campus US, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved

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Bernhardsson, MagnusTätting, LoveSandberg, OlofSchilcher, JörgAspenberg, Per
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