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Method matters: impact of in-scenario instruction on simulation-based teamwork training
CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2017 (English)In: Advances in Science and Technology Research Journal, ISSN 2364-3277, E-ISSN 2059-0628, Vol. 2, no 25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The rationale for introducing full-scale patient simulators in training to improve patient safety is to recreate clinical situations in a realistic setting. Although high-fidelity simulators mimic a wide range of human features, simulators differ from the body of a sick patient. The gap between the simulator and the human body implies a need for facilitators to provide information to help participants understand scenarios. The authors aimed at describing different methods that facilitators in our dataset used to provide such extra scenario information and how the different methods to convey information affected how scenarios played out.

Methods

A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to examine the variation of methods to deliver extra scenario information to participants. A multistage approach was employed. The authors selected film clips from a shared database of 31 scenarios from three participating simulation centers. A multidisciplinary research team performed a collaborative analysis of representative film clips focusing on the interplay between participants, facilitators, and the physical environment. After that, the entire material was revisited to further examine and elaborate the initial findings.

Results

The material displayed four distinct methods for facilitators to convey information to participants in simulation-based teamwork training. The choice of method had impact on the participating teams regarding flow of work, pace, and team communication. Facilitators’ close access to the teams’ activities when present in the simulation suite, either embodied or disembodied in the simulation, facilitated the timing for providing information, which was critical for maintaining the flow of activities in the scenario. The mediation of information by a loudspeaker or an earpiece from the adjacent operator room could be disturbing for team communication.

Conclusions

In-scenario instruction is an essential component of simulation-based teamwork training that has been largely overlooked in previous research. The ways in which facilitators convey information about the simulated patient have the potential to shape the simulation activities and thereby serve different learning goals. Although immediate timing to maintain an adequate pace is necessary for professionals to engage in training of medical emergencies, novices may gain from a slower tempo to train complex clinical team tasks systematically.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017. Vol. 2, no 25
Keyword [en]
Crew resource management; Cueing; Facilitator; Fidelity; Healthcare; Instructor; Interprofessional education; Simulation; Teamwork; Video analysis
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146346DOI: 10.1186/s41077-017-0059-9PubMedID: 29450026OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-146346DiVA, id: diva2:1195983
Available from: 2018-04-07 Created: 2018-04-07 Last updated: 2018-04-20Bibliographically approved

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Nyström, SofiaDahlberg, JohannaEdelbring, SamuelAbrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

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Interaction Technologies

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