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Nursing assistants mattersAn ethnographic study of knowledge sharing in interprofessional practice
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
Univ Technol Sydney, Australia; Univ Stellenbosch, South Africa.
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2018 (English)In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 25, no 2, article id e12216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interprofessional collaboration involves some kind of knowledge sharing, which is essential and will be important in the future in regard to the opportunities and challenges in practices for delivering safe and effective health care. Nursing assistants are seldom mentioned as a group of health care workers that contribute to interprofessional collaboration in health care practice. The aim of this ethnographic study was to explore how the nursing assistants knowledge can be shared in a team on a spinal cord injury rehabilitation ward. Using a sociomaterial perspective on practice, we captured different aspects of interprofessional collaboration in health care. The findings reveal how knowledge was shared between professionals, depending on different kinds of practice architecture. These specific cultural-discursive, material-economic, and social-political arrangements enabled possibilities through which nursing assistants knowledge informed other practices, and others knowledge informed the practice of nursing assistants. By studying what health care professionals actually do and say in practice, we found that the nursing assistants could make a valuable contribution of knowledge to the team.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 25, no 2, article id e12216
Keywords [en]
collaboration; ethnography; nursing assistant; professional knowledge; professional practice; sociomaterial; team work
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147806DOI: 10.1111/nin.12216ISI: 000430111800003PubMedID: 28776798OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-147806DiVA, id: diva2:1205633
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-05-14

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Lindh Falk, AnnikaHammar, MatsAbrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
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Division of Occupational TherapyFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDivision of Children's and Women's healthDepartment of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in LinköpingDivision of Community Medicine
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Nursing Inquiry
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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