liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The platelets perspective to pathogen reduction technologies
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
CHUL, Canada; Univ Laval, Canada.
2018 (English)In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 140-147Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A wide variety of clinical conditions, associated with low circulating platelet counts, require platelet transfusion in order to normalize hemostatic function. Although single-donor apheresis platelets bear the lowest risk of transfusion-transmitted infections, pathogen reduction technologies (PRT) are being implemented worldwide to reduce this risk further through inactivation of known, emergent and as yet to be discovered nucleic acid-based pathogens. Human blood platelets are now known to harbor a diverse transcriptome, important to their function and comprised of amp;gt;5000 protein-coding messenger RNAs and different classes of non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs. Our appreciation of the nucleic acid-dependent functions of platelets is likely to increase. On the other hand, the side effects of PRT on platelet function are underappreciated. Recent evidences suggest that PRT may compromise platelets responsiveness to agonists, and induce platelet activation. For instance, platelets have the propensity to release proinflammatory microparticles (MPs) upon activation, and the possibility that PRT may enhance the production of platelet MPs in platelet concentrates (PCs) appears likely. With this in mind, it would be timely and appropriate to investigate other means to inactivate pathogens more specifically, or to modify the currently available PRT so to better preserve the platelet function and improve the safety of PCs; platelets perspective to PRT deserves to be considered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC , 2018. Vol. 29, no 2, p. 140-147
Keywords [en]
Nucleic acids; pathogen reduction technologies; platelet activation; platelet concentrate; RNA transcriptome
National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147447DOI: 10.1080/09537104.2017.1293806ISI: 000428280600006PubMedID: 28355122OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-147447DiVA, id: diva2:1206329
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden [LIO-202231, LIO-203061]; Canadian Blood Services/Canadian Institutes of Health Research Blood Utilization and Conservation Initiatives via Health Canada [286777, 327364]

Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-05-16

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Osman, Abdimajid
By organisation
Division of Microbiology and Molecular MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Clinical Chemistry
In the same journal
Platelets
Hematology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 48 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf