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Comparing Climate Policy Processes in India, Brazil, and South Africa: Domestic Engagements With International Climate Policy Frameworks
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1912-5538
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
Off Sci and Innovat, Brazil.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Environment and Development, ISSN 1070-4965, E-ISSN 1552-5465, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 186-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using policy cycle model as a heuristic, this article studies Indian, Brazilian, and South African engagement with Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) by (a) comparing NAMA policy process and (b) identifying factors driving or limiting the frameworks domestic application. India largely remained uninterested in NAMAs, Brazil aligned its domestic climate policy and NAMAs, while South Africa had a more nuanced engagement when formulating NAMAs. Four factors influenced these countries NAMA engagements: the level and necessity of international support, the availability of domestic policy provisions to tackle climate change, the domestic institutional capacity to coordinate interministerial functioning, and the role of individuals in the institutional apparatus. As an international climate policy framework, studying NAMA engagement provides learnings for nationally determined contributions under the Paris Agreement for designing the instrument, ensuring clarity on support provisions for ratcheting up ambitions, and enhancing institutional capacity, to expedite transition from policy formulation to implementation and beyond.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC , 2018. Vol. 27, no 2, p. 186-209
Keywords [en]
policy process; climate policy; international policy frameworks; NAMAs; NDCs
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148079DOI: 10.1177/1070496518767947ISI: 000432240700004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-148079DiVA, id: diva2:1211375
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Energy Agency [P35462-2]

Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-05-30

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Upadhyaya, PrabhatFridahl, MathiasLinnér, Björn-Ola
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Tema Environmental ChangeCentre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPRFaculty of Arts and Sciences
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