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Relevance of Kinesiophobia in Relation to Changes Over Time Among Patients After an Acute Coronary Artery Disease Event
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
Univ Boras, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: JOURNAL OF CARDIOPULMONARY REHABILITATION AND PREVENTION, ISSN 1932-7501, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 224-230Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To identify levels of kinesiophobia during the first 4 months after an acute episode of coronary artery disease (CAD), while controlling for gender, anxiety, depression, and personality traits. Methods: In all, 106 patients with CAD (25 women), mean age 63.1 11.5 years, were included in the study at the cardiac intensive care unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden. The patients completed questionnaires at 3 time points: in the cardiac intensive care unit (baseline), 2 weeks, and 4 months after baseline. The primary outcome measure was kinesiophobia. Secondary outcome measures were gender, anxiety, depression, harm avoidance, and positive and negative affect. A linear mixed model procedure was used to compare kinesiophobia across time points and gender. Secondary outcome measures were used as covariates. Results: Kinesiophobia decreased over time (P = .005) and there was a significant effect of gender (P = .045; higher values for women). The presence of a high level of kinesiophobia was 25.4% at baseline, 19% after 2 weeks, and 21.1% after 4 months. Inclusion of the covariates showed that positive and negative affect and harm avoidance increased model fit. The effects of time and gender remained significant. Conclusions: This study highlights that kinesiophobia decreased over time after an acute CAD episode. Nonetheless, a substantial part of the patients were identified with a high level of kinesiophobia across time, which emphasizes the need for screening and the design of a treatment intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS , 2018. Vol. 38, no 4, p. 224-230
Keywords [en]
cardiac rehabilitation; fear of movement; harm avoidance; positive and negative affect
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149689DOI: 10.1097/HCR.0000000000000265ISI: 000436872200007PubMedID: 28671936OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-149689DiVA, id: diva2:1234448
Note

Funding Agencies|Research and Development Council for Southern Gothenburg and Bohuslan, Sweden [VGFOUGSB-343481]

Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-07-24

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Citation style
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