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Personality traits predict and moderate the outcome of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for chronic tinnitus
Univ Auckland, New Zealand; Philipps Univ, Germany.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Univ Auckland, New Zealand.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5216-1031
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4753-6745
Donau Univ, Austria.
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 538-544Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate whether the Big Five personality traits predict the outcome of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) and whether they moderate the outcome between ICBT and face-to-face group cognitive behavioural therapy (GCBT). Design: This study investigated the Big Five personality traits as predictors and moderators of the outcome (tinnitus handicap) in a trial comparing ICBT and GCBT for chronic tinnitus. Study sample: N= 84 patients with chronic tinnitus were randomised to either ICBT (n = 41) or GCBT (n = 43). Results: A multilevel model for discontinuous change was performed. Higher scores on the "openness" scale of the Big Five Personality inventory (BFI-10) predicted a lower tinnitus handicap (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, THI) at post-treatment in ICBT (p amp;lt;0.05). Openness moderated the outcome at post-treatment in favour of ICBT (p amp;lt;0.05). Higher scores on the BFI-10 "conscientiousness" scale predicted a more favourable outcome in ICBT at 6-month (p amp;lt;0.05) and 12-month follow-up (pamp;lt; 0.05), but the BFI-10 "conscientiousness" scale was positively associated with the THI at baseline (pamp;lt;0.05). Conclusions: ICBT might be the preferred treatment choice for tinnitus patients being open towards new experiences. Moreover, ICBT requires autonomous work and self-motivation by the patient in order to have an impact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD , 2018. Vol. 57, no 7, p. 538-544
Keywords [en]
Tinnitus; cognitive behavioural therapy; Internet-based therapy; personality traits; predictors; moderators
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150310DOI: 10.1080/14992027.2018.1432902ISI: 000440360300008PubMedID: 29383953OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-150310DiVA, id: diva2:1239470
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16

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Weise, CorneliaAndersson, Gerhard
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Disability ResearchFaculty of Arts and SciencesThe Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchPsychology
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