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Developmental Neurobiology of Olfactory Preference and Avoidance Learning
Emotional Brain Institute, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
Emotional Brain Institute, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
2014 (English)In: Oxford Handbook of Developmental Behavioral Neuroscience / [ed] Mark S. Blumberg, John H. Freeman, and Scott R. Robinson, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 573-587Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Infants from a myriad of species attach to their caregiver regardless of the quality of care received, although the quality of care influences development of the stress system. To better understand this relationship, this chapter characterizes attachment learning and the supporting neural circuit in infant rat pups. During early life, odors paired with pain paradoxically produce subsequent approach responses to the odor and attachment. The neural circuit supporting this attachment learning involves the olfactory bulb encoding the preference learning and suppression of the amygdala to prevent the aversion learning. Increasing the stress hormone corticosterone during acquisition or decreasing endogenous opioids during consolidation prevents this odor approach learning. These data suggest that early life attachment is readily learned and supported by both increased opioids and decreased stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. p. 573-587
Series
Oxford Handbook of Developmental Behavioral Neuroscience ; 27
Keywords [en]
Stress system, attachment learning, odors, pain, olfactory bulb, amygdale, corticosterone, endogenous opioids
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150383DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195314731.013.0028ISBN: 9780195314731 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-150383DiVA, id: diva2:1240536
Available from: 2018-08-21 Created: 2018-08-21 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved

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Shionoya, Kiseko

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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Output format
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