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Fungal-Mediated Above–Belowground Interactions: The Community Approach, Stability, Evolution, Mechanisms, and Applications
Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.
Ecological Sciences, James Hutton Institute, Dundee, UK.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0811-1229
Department of Soil Microbiology and Symbiotic Systems, Estación Experimental del Zaidín (CSIC), Granada, Spain.
2018 (English)In: Aboveground–Belowground Community Ecology / [ed] Ohgushi, Takayuki; Wurst, Susanne; Johnson, Scott N., Springer, 2018, p. 85-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Our goal within this chapter is to review fungal-mediated above–belowground interactions in which belowground organisms influence aboveground organisms (or vice versa) primarily via a shared host plant, but to also highlight what we feel are the biggest areas for future research within this field: the community approach, stability, evolution, mechanisms, and application of these interactions. First, the community approach examines multiple simultaneously interacting species as communities, an approach that will greatly benefit from the future use of -omics techniques. Examining a greater diversity of interactions (via competition, facilitation, or predation) will likely reveal more varied outcomes that better describe patterns in nature than when individual interactions are considered. Second, we explore the stability of fungal-mediated above–belowground interactions. Given that systems can have multiple stable states influenced by multiple factors, we ask how frequently these interactions occur across stable states. Third, we present three areas in which we expect selection to influence fungal above–belowground interactions: simple (one-way) selective influences of organisms; evolutionary feedbacks and co-evolutionary arms races; and indirect versus direct selective influences. Fourth, we identify mechanisms driving the indirect interactions observed via host plants in fungal-mediated above–belowground interactions and factors influencing their context dependency. Finally, we explore potential applications of these interactions as novel biotechnologies to promote agricultural production, restore natural and degraded habitats, promote ecosystem services, and mitigate against the impacts of climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018. p. 85-116
Series
Ecological Studies, ISSN 0070-8356 ; 234
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151715DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-91614-9_5ISBN: 9783319916132 (print)ISBN: 9783319916149 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-151715DiVA, id: diva2:1252945
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved

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Malacrinò, Antonino

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