liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Political Economy of Intellectual Property Rights: the Paradox of Article 27 Exemplified in Ghana
University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3309-3840
2018 (English)In: Review of African Political Economy, ISSN 0305-6244, E-ISSN 1740-1720, Vol. 45, no 157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Orthodox copyright scholarship frames piracy in ‘developing’ countries as a detrimental and illegal practice that results from these countries’ lack of economic, social and cultural development. It argues that piracy needs to be discouraged, regulated, and finally overcome for legitimate business to flourish. In this article, the authors challenge this viewpoint and question whether the implementation of international copyright instruments in legislation across Africa really promotes those local economies or if it merely exposes them to neo-colonial exploitation. While the early international treaties on intellectual property rights (IPR) were formulated by European states and implemented in most parts of Africa through colonial laws, more recent legislation has been globally implemented through institutions such as the United Nations or the World Trade Organization, which remain dominated by Western interests. Through a structured overview of the adoption of IPR treaties in African countries, the authors advance a political economy perspective of intellectual property rights as a (neo-)colonial regime.

Abstract [fr]

Les membres de l’école traditionnelle sur les questions de droits d’auteurs mettent en avant le piratage dans les pays « en développement » comme une pratique préjudiciable et illégale qui résulte du manque de développement économique, social et culturel de ces pays. Ils soutiennent que le piratage doit être découragé, réglementé et finalement surmonté pour que le commerce légitime puisse prospérer. À travers cet article, nous remettons en question ce point de vue et nous nous demandons si la mise en place de mesures internationales relatives au droit d’auteur dans la législation à travers le continent africain, favorise réellement ces économies locales ou si elles ne font que les exposer à l’exploitation néo-coloniale. Alors que les premiers traités internationaux sur les droits de propriété intellectuelle étaient formulés par des États européens puis appliqués à travers la plupart des régions d’Afrique à travers les lois coloniales, plus récemment la législation a été globalement mise en oeuvre par des institutions telles que l’Organisation des Nations unies ou l’Organisation mondiale du commerce, qui restent dominées par les intérêts occidentaux. À travers une vue d’ensemble structurée de l’adoption des traités sur les droits de propriété intellectuelle dans les pays africains, nous mettons en avant une perspective d’économie politique des droits de propriété intellectuelle en tant que régime (néo-)colonial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 45, no 157
Keywords [en]
piracy, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 27, cultural rights, copyright, intellectual property rights
Keywords [fr]
piratage, Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme, Article 27, droits culturels, droits d’auteur, droits de propriété intellectuelle
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Cultural Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152125DOI: 10.1080/03056244.2018.1500358OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-152125DiVA, id: diva2:1256704
Available from: 2018-10-17 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2018-11-21

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(492 kB)47 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 492 kBChecksum SHA-512
8bf0bfb8c82b0c0ae0a39da53e87a341d099050b91fa179af1b412354df4cd774f0277f706363bce65f9d58cfabd191eaef9235689f9555278e0161d452c32b6
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fredriksson, Martin
By organisation
Department of Culture Studies – Tema QFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Review of African Political Economy
Humanities and the ArtsCultural Studies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 47 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 66 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf