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Two faces of the coin: Minireview for dissecting the role of reactive oxygen species in stem cell potency and lineage commitment
Univ Sharjah, U Arab Emirates.
Univ Sharjah, U Arab Emirates.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Sharjah, U Arab Emirates; Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
2018 (English)In: JOURNAL OF ADVANCED RESEARCH, ISSN 2090-1232, Vol. 14, p. 73-79Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced as by-products of several intracellular metabolic pathways and are reduced to more stable molecules by several protective pathways. The presence of high levels of ROS can be associated with disturbance of cell function and could lead to apoptosis. The presence of ROS within the physiological range has many effects on several signalling pathways. In stem cells, this role can range between keeping the potency of the naive stem cells to differentiation towards a certain lineage. In addition, the level of certain ROS would change according to the differentiation stage. For example, the presence of ROS can be associated with increasing the proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells, decreasing the potency of embryonic stem cells and adding to the genomic stability of induced pluripotent stem cells. ROS can enhance the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes, adipocytes, endothelial cells, keratinocytes and neurons. In the meantime, ROS inhibits osteogenesis and enhances the differentiation of cartilage to the hypertrophic stage, which is associated with chondrocyte death. Thus, ROS may form a link between naive stem cells in the body and the environment. In addition, monitoring of ROS levels in vitro may help in tissue regeneration studies. (C) 2018 Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Cairo University.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2018. Vol. 14, p. 73-79
Keywords [en]
Stem cells; Reactive oxygen species; Differentiation; Osteogenesis; Potency
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152600DOI: 10.1016/j.jare.2018.05.012ISI: 000448049500008PubMedID: 30023134OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-152600DiVA, id: diva2:1262132
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-11-09

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El-Serafi, Ahmed T.
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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