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Adverse health effects of low levels of perceived control in Swedish and Russian community samples
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
International Institute for Society and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, UCL, London, UK.
Institute of Internal Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
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2007 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 7, no 314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This cross-sectional study of two middle-aged community samples from Sweden and Russia examined the distribution of perceived control scores in the two populations, investigated differences in individual control items between the populations, and assessed the association between perceived control and self-rated health.

Methods: The samples consisted of men and women aged 45–69 years, randomly selected from national and local population registers in southeast Sweden (n = 1007) and in Novosibirsk, Russia (n = 9231). Data were collected by structured questionnaires and clinical measures at a visit to a clinic. The questionnaire covered socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, societal circumstances, and psychosocial measures. Self-rated health was assessed by standard single question with five possible answers, with a cut-off point at the top two alternatives.

Results: 32.2 % of Swedish men and women reported good health, compared to 10.3 % of Russian men and women. Levels of perceived control were also significantly lower in Russia than in Sweden and varied by socio-demographic parameters in both populations. Sub-item analysis of the control questionnaire revealed substantial differences between the populations both in the perception of control over life and over health. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratios (OR) of poor self-rated health were significantly increased in men and women with low perceived control in both countries (OR between 2.61 and 4.26).

Conclusions: Although the cross-sectional design does not allow causal inference, these results support the view that perceived control influences health, and that it may mediate the link between socioeconomic hardship and health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 7, no 314
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15548DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-7-314OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-15548DiVA: diva2:126414
Note
Original Publication: Johanna Lundberg, Martin Bobak, Sofia Malyutina, Margareta Kristenson and Hynek Pikhart, Adverse health effects of low levels of perceived control in Swedish and Russian community samples, 2007, BMC Public Health, (7), 314. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-7-314 Licensee: BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/ Available from: 2008-12-21 Created: 2008-11-17 Last updated: 2009-05-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Social status: a state of mind?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social status: a state of mind?
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis is concerned with social stratification of psychosocial factors and social position measurement in population samples collected in mid-Sweden 2000-2006. Traditional resource-based measures of social position (occupation, education) and so far less explored prestige-based measures (subjective status, status incongruence) are tested with respect to their associations with psychosocial factors, emotions, and selfrated health. Three papers in this thesis are based on data from the Life Conditions, Stress, and Health (LSH) study, using a randomly selected population sample. Data for the fourth paper is a regional sample drawn from the health-related survey “Liv och Hälsa 2000”. Statistical methods range from correlation analysis to logistic regression and repeated measures analyses.

Results from studies I and IV show that psychosocial factors are unequally distributed within the population in a linear manner, so that the lower the socioeconomic position (SEP), the more unfavourable levels. This is independent of whether we study this in a highly unequal setting such as Russia, or in a more egalitarian society such as Sweden. The stability of psychometric instruments over two years tend to be lower for all instruments among low SEP groups, and differ significantly for self-esteem and perceived control among groups with high and low education, and for cynicism among groups with high and low occupational status. Results from studies II and III point to the relevance of individuals’ own thoughts about themselves, and the potential impact on the self by normative judgements of social position in a certain hierarchical setting. In paper II, the prestige-based measure of subjective status was influenced by resource-based measures, such as self-rated economy and education, but also by life satisfaction and psychosocial factors. The importance of self-evaluation was especially obvious from the study on status incongruence (study III) where the traditionally protective effecs of a high education seem to disappear when combined with a lowstatus occupation. Shaming experiences may play an important role here for our understanding of self-perception.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2008. 96 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1083
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15552 (URN)978-91-7393-781-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-12-12, Berzeliussalen, Universitetssjukhuset, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-11-17 Created: 2008-11-17 Last updated: 2009-05-06Bibliographically approved

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