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Status incongruence revisited - associations with shame and mental well-being (GHQ)
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. (Landstinget i Östergötland; Centre for Public Health Sciences; Centre for Public Health Sciences; Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum; Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum)
Department of Social Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden.
2009 (English)In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 31, no 4, 478-493 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study purpose: Status incongruence has been related to poor health and all-cause mortality, and could be a growing public health problem due to changes in the labour market in later decades. Shaming experiences have been suggested as playing a part in the aetiology. Our aim was to study the risk for shaming experiences, pessimism, anxiety, depressive feelings, and poor mental well-being (GHQ) with a special focus on shame, in four status categories: negatively and positively incongruent individuals, and low-status and high-status congruent individuals.

Method: Data comprised 14 854 working men and women from a regional sample of randomly selected respondents, 18-79 years. Logistic regression was used to study differences in risk for negative emotional outcomes. Results: The negative incongruent category persisted as the group most at risk for all negative emotional outcomes (OR 1.5-1.9; p<0.05-<0.001). When testing the risk for poor mental well-being among the status categories with and without shaming experiences, OR for all groups with shaming experiences were elevated. Among groups without shame, only the negative incongruent category remained at risk (OR 2.7; p<0.05) after adjustment.

Conclusion: Negative incongruent status is associated with adverse emotional outcomes, among them shame, which is a previously unappreciated aspect of status incongruence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 31, no 4, 478-493 p.
Keyword [en]
social status • public health • status incongruence • GHQ • shame • mental wellbeing
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15550DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2008.01148.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-15550DiVA: diva2:126416
Note
This is the author version of the following article: Johanna Lundberg, Margareta Kristenson and Bengt Starrin, Status incongruence revisited: associations with shame and mental wellbeing, 2009, SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH and ILLNESS, (31), 4, 478-493. which has been published in final form at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9566.2008.01148.x Copyright: Blackwell Publishing Ltd http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/ Available from: 2009-06-10 Created: 2008-11-17 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Social status: a state of mind?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social status: a state of mind?
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis is concerned with social stratification of psychosocial factors and social position measurement in population samples collected in mid-Sweden 2000-2006. Traditional resource-based measures of social position (occupation, education) and so far less explored prestige-based measures (subjective status, status incongruence) are tested with respect to their associations with psychosocial factors, emotions, and selfrated health. Three papers in this thesis are based on data from the Life Conditions, Stress, and Health (LSH) study, using a randomly selected population sample. Data for the fourth paper is a regional sample drawn from the health-related survey “Liv och Hälsa 2000”. Statistical methods range from correlation analysis to logistic regression and repeated measures analyses.

Results from studies I and IV show that psychosocial factors are unequally distributed within the population in a linear manner, so that the lower the socioeconomic position (SEP), the more unfavourable levels. This is independent of whether we study this in a highly unequal setting such as Russia, or in a more egalitarian society such as Sweden. The stability of psychometric instruments over two years tend to be lower for all instruments among low SEP groups, and differ significantly for self-esteem and perceived control among groups with high and low education, and for cynicism among groups with high and low occupational status. Results from studies II and III point to the relevance of individuals’ own thoughts about themselves, and the potential impact on the self by normative judgements of social position in a certain hierarchical setting. In paper II, the prestige-based measure of subjective status was influenced by resource-based measures, such as self-rated economy and education, but also by life satisfaction and psychosocial factors. The importance of self-evaluation was especially obvious from the study on status incongruence (study III) where the traditionally protective effecs of a high education seem to disappear when combined with a lowstatus occupation. Shaming experiences may play an important role here for our understanding of self-perception.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2008. 96 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1083
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15552 (URN)978-91-7393-781-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-12-12, Berzeliussalen, Universitetssjukhuset, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-11-17 Created: 2008-11-17 Last updated: 2009-05-06Bibliographically approved

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Lundberg, JohannaKristenson, Margareta

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