liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Internet-Based Interventions in Chronic Somatic Disease
Univ Ulm, Germany.
Univ Ulm, Germany.
Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Germany.
Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Acad Med Ctr, Netherlands.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International, ISSN 1866-0452, E-ISSN 1866-0452, Vol. 115, no 38, p. 659-+Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Clinical guidelines recommend psychosocial care as an integral part of medical treatment, but access is often limited. Technology-based approaches provide an attractive opportunity to optimize health outcomes and quality of life in people with chronic somatic diseases e.g. by means of Internet-and mobile-based interventions (IMIs). The present article provides an overview on the basics of IMIs, applications and their evidence base for people living with chronic somatic diseases. Methods: We conducted a selective literature search in the PubMed and Cochrane databases. Reviews which included randomized controlled trials investigating psychological IMIs were discussed pertaining to their relevance for the population described. Results: IMIs lead to a change in unfavorable behavior connected to chronic somatic diseases. IMIs can foster protective factors like balanced physical activity or risk factors like smoking or alcohol consumption. However, studies reveal small effect sizes of d=0.25 for physical activity and an averaged effect size of d=0.20 for smoking and alcohol consumption. Additionally, IMIs can be used for the (co-) treatment of chronic somatic diseases, for instance to increase disease-specific self-efficacy in patients with diabetes (d=0.23). Studies included in meta-analyses are often highly heterogenous and are investigated in research contexts with limited health care services relevance. Conclusion: IMIs are potentially effective when aiming at lifestyle changes and supporting medical treatment in people with chronic somatic diseases. However, results are still heterogenous and the evidence base is limited regarding specific settings, compounding the discussion of possible ways of implementing IMIs into our health-care systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DEUTSCHER AERZTE-VERLAG GMBH , 2018. Vol. 115, no 38, p. 659-+
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152833DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2018.0659ISI: 000449188100010PubMedID: 30381130OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-152833DiVA, id: diva2:1265207
Note

Funding Agencies|Barmer GEK; BMBF; EU; DRV; DRV-Bund; SVLFG

Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2018-11-22

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, Gerhard
By organisation
PsychologyFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 15 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf