liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Separating melanin from hemodynamics in nevi using multimode hyperspectral dermoscopy and spatial frequency domain spectroscopy
Spectral Molecular Imaging, Inc., USA.
Spectral Molecular Imaging, Inc., USA.
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, USA.
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, USA.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 21, no 11, article id 114001Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Changes in the pattern and distribution of both melanocytes (pigment producing) and vasculature (hemoglobin containing) are important in distinguishing melanocytic proliferations. The ability to accurately measure melanin distribution at different depths and to distinguish it from hemoglobin is clearly important when assessing pigmented lesions (benign versus malignant). We have developed a multimode hyperspectral dermoscope (SkinSpect™) able to more accurately image both melanin and hemoglobin distribution in skin. SkinSpect uses both hyperspectral and polarization-sensitive measurements. SkinSpect’s higher accuracy has been obtained by correcting for the effect of melanin absorption on hemoglobin absorption in measurements of melanocytic nevi. In vivo human skin pigmented nevi (N=20) were evaluated with the SkinSpect, and measured melanin and hemoglobin concentrations were compared with spatial frequency domain spectroscopy (SFDS) measurements. We confirm that both systems show low correlation of hemoglobin concentrations with regions containing different melanin concentrations (R=0.13 for SFDS, R=0.07 for SkinSpect).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2016. Vol. 21, no 11, article id 114001
Keywords [en]
hyperspectral imaging; polarization; melanoma; tissue phantoms; spatial frequency domain; melanin
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152310DOI: 10.1117/1.jbo.21.11.114001ISI: 000390668200002PubMedID: 27830262Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84995593565OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-152310DiVA, id: diva2:1265918
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(6132 kB)34 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 6132 kBChecksum SHA-512
0d65d198a5f915011502ee7b9f01e9be1c7a3d89f1db910ace632378f8ae8f5d96a199aa5518d4eecf86101c0e9419685f119f218b6ad422c24e5c8ef3025e34
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Saager, Rolf B.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Saager, Rolf B.
In the same journal
Journal of Biomedical Optics
Physical Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 34 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 36 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf