liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sociocultural Disadvantage, Traumatic Life Events, and Psychiatric Symptoms in Preadolescent Children
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2009 (English)In: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, ISSN 0002-9432, E-ISSN 1939-0025, Vol. 79, no 3, 387-397 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has demonstrated impact of psychosocial adversity on the mental health of children. This cross-sectional study examined the differential relationships between life-time exposure to interpersonal and non-interpersonal traumatic life events as well as sociocultural factors (family social class and immigrant family), and the level of externalizing versus internalizing symptoms. Participants included 258 children aged 6 to 12 years from two Swedish elementary schools. Information was obtained from their parents by means of questionnaires (a demographic form including information about parental occupation and country of origin, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist). While controlling for gender, age and the other symptom dimension, the sociocultural factors were associated to internalizing but not to externalizing symptoms. In contrast, traumatic life events and especially interpersonal traumas related to externalizing symptoms but not to internalizing symptoms. These findings provide some support for specificity of psychosocial adversities and for the importance of interpersonal traumas, in the impact on child mental health.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 79, no 3, 387-397 p.
Keyword [en]
stressor-outcome specificity, traumatic life events, sociocultural disadvantage, mental health, children
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15684DOI: 10.1037/a0016559OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-15684DiVA: diva2:126937
Available from: 2008-11-26 Created: 2008-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-14
In thesis
1. Psychosocial Stress, Mental Health and Salivary Cortisol in Children and Adolescents
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial Stress, Mental Health and Salivary Cortisol in Children and Adolescents
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Stressful experiences and conditions in childhood influence the health and well-being of the growing individual, and can also confer a long-lasting impact into adult life. Delineating the social, mental and biological aspects of stress in children and adolescents is therefore of great concern for human beings. Despite these notions, much knowledge is lacking regarding stress in childhood.

This thesis aimed at examining diverse aspects of stress in children and adolescents: associations between social conditions, traumatic life events, mental health, and salivary cortisol as a measure of the activity of a major physiological stress system. Cross-sectional samples included two non-clinical samples of school-aged children (N=240-336) and adolescents (N =400), and two clinical samples of children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (N =23) and adolescents who had experienced childhood abuse (N =15). Main measures were salivary cortisol sampled three times a day, and questionnaires to teachers, parents and children with questions about each child’s mental health, traumatic life events and about the socioeconomic situation of the parents.

The main findings include observation of 1) higher cortisol levels in children with a moderate level of psychosocial burden (low socioeconomic status, immigrant family, social impairment of mental health problems), 2) higher cortisol levels in children with OCD who also displayed a tendency to decreasing cortisol in the face of an acute stressor, and 3) cortisol was positively related to mental health problems in abused adolescents. Furthermore, the deleterious effect of 4) traumatic events involving a social dimension, interpersonal traumas, and 5) cumulative traumatic events, polytraumatization, on the mental health of children and adolescents was indicated.

The findings are discussed with respect to the complex interactions between social, mental and biological aspects of children and adolescents. The consequences of adverse experiences in childhood may represent pathways to future health problems. Consideration of the social circumstances in childhood might in the future guide public health policies and the identification of target groups for preventive interventions as well as leading to improvements in treatment for children exposed to severe stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2008. 138 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1084
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15686 (URN)978-91-7393-776-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-12-03, Berzeliussalen, Hälsouniversitetet, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-11-26 Created: 2008-11-26 Last updated: 2009-08-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textLink to Ph.D. thesis

Authority records BETA

Gustafsson, Per E.Larsson, IngbethNelson, NinaGustafsson, Per A

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gustafsson, Per E.Larsson, IngbethNelson, NinaGustafsson, Per A
By organisation
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Faculty of Health SciencesDepartment of Clinical and Experimental MedicinePediatrics
In the same journal
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 314 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf