liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Measuring ketones in the field: rapid and reliable measures of beta-hydroxybutyrate in birds
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
2019 (English)In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 161, no 1, p. 205-210Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ketone bodies such as beta-hydroxybutyrate are important indicators of metabolic condition in birds and are linked to a suite of ecologically relevant factors including migratory decision-making, hunger level and ectoparasite load. Portable point-of-care (POC) devices designed to measure ketones in humans offer a cheap and easy solution to field physiologists in comparison with previous laboratory methods; however, their accuracy for use in birds has received scant attention. Here, we assessed the accuracy of a POC ketone meter (FreeStyle Precision Neo, Abbott, IL, USA) using samples from intermittently fed Red Junglefowl Gallus gallus. Although the device overestimated ketone levels in comparison with laboratory-derived values, random error was low and laboratory vs. device values correlated well, indicating that the Precision Neo is of sufficient accuracy for use in the field and is a pragmatic choice for avian physiologists.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2019. Vol. 161, no 1, p. 205-210
Keywords [en]
intermittent feeding; ketosis; point-of-care; Red Junglefowl
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153969DOI: 10.1111/ibi.12643ISI: 000454604400018OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-153969DiVA, id: diva2:1281542
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish research council Formas [2013-293]; Swedish Centre of Excellence in Animal Welfare Science; Carl Tryggers Stiftelse for Vetenskaplig Forsknin

Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2019-10-10
In thesis
1. Intermittent fasting in chickens: Physiological mechanisms and welfare implications for broiler breeders
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intermittent fasting in chickens: Physiological mechanisms and welfare implications for broiler breeders
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Broiler breeder chickens are the parent stock used to produce broiler chickens raised for human consumption and have long been caught in a welfare dilemma. The immensely successful selection of fast-growing meat-type chickens over the last 80 years has created a remarkably efficient meat-producer and given us access to cheap chicken meat but has also created health problems for the animals. These problems especially affect the breeder generation, which must be raised with strict feed restriction to limit weight gain and thus maintain physical health and normal fertility. At the same time, however, feed restriction causes chronic hunger and feeding frustration with reduced animal welfare as a result. In the EU alone 60 million breeders are affected annually and although the problem is well-known within the industry, there is financial incentive to keep selecting for even higher growth potential in broilers, further increasing the problems for broiler breeders.

Many strategies for reducing the impact of growth restriction on breeder welfare have been suggested and are usually aimed at somehow increasing the amount of feed given at feeding times. This can be done either through adding bulky fibers to the diet or by reducing feeding frequency. In this thesis, focus is on the latter as we explore the effects of intermittent fasting (IF) on the welfare of young broiler breeders as well as wild-type Red Junglefowl. Intermittent fasting, or “skip-a-day” feeding, is supposedly the most common feeding strategy for broiler breeders worldwide but is perceived as welfare-reducing and thus illegal in Sweden and several other European countries. In spite of this, the scientific knowledge of how this type of feeding affects chicken welfare is scarce.

Assessing the overall effect of IF on breeder welfare is complicated by large variations in both physiological and behavioral parameters between feeding and fasting days, but it does appear that chicken welfare is improved at least on the feeding days of IF regimens. It also seems that some of the health benefits reported from mammalian studies of IF may apply to chickens as well, although behavioral indicators still point to welfare issues unless the level of feed restriction can be relaxed. In comparison with daily feed restriction, IF appears to increase the motivation for feed consumption but to reduce the motivation for appetitive behaviors such as foraging, which may explain why birds fed on this type of schedule are often reported as calmer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2019. p. 54
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 2005
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160814 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-160814 (DOI)9789176850183 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-11-22, Planck, Physics building, Campus Valla, Linköping, 09:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindholm, CarolineAltimiras, JordiLees, John
By organisation
BiologyFaculty of Science & Engineering
In the same journal
Ibis
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 23 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf