liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Fitness, cortical thickness and surface area in overweight/obese children: The mediating role of body composition and relationship with intelligence
Northeastern Univ, MA 02115 USA; Univ Granada, Spain.
Univ Granada, Spain.
Univ Granada, Spain.
Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Spain; Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Mental CIBERSAM, Spain.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 186, p. 771-781Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cortical thickness and surface area are thought to be genetically unrelated and shaped by independent neurobiological events suggesting that they should be considered separately in morphometric analyses. Although the developmental trajectories of cortical thickness and surface area may differ across brain regions and ages, there is no consensus regarding the relationships of physical fitness with cortical thickness and surface area as well as for its subsequent influence on intelligence. Thus, this study examines: (i) the associations of physical fitness components (i.e., cardiorespiratory fitness, speed-agility and muscular fitness) with overall and regional cortical thickness and surface area; (ii) whether body composition indicators (i.e., body mass index, fat-free mass index and fat mass index) mediate these associations; and (iii) the association of physical fitness and cortical thickness with intelligence in overweight/obese children. A total of 101 overweight/obese children aged 8-11 years were recruited in Granada, Spain. The physical fitness components were assessed following the ALPHA health-related fitness test battery. T1-weighted images were acquired with a 3.0 Tesla Siemens Magnetom Tim Trio system. We used FreeSurfer software version 5.3.0 to assess cortical thickness (mm) and surface area (mm(2)). The main results showed that cardiorespiratory fitness and speed-agility were related to overall cortical thickness (beta = 0.321 and beta = 0.302, respectively; both P amp;lt; 0.05), and in turn, cortical thickness was associated with higher intelligence (beta = 0.198, P amp;lt; 0.05). Muscular fitness was not related to overall cortical thickness. None of the three physical fitness components were related to surface area (p amp;gt; 0.05). The associations of cardiorespiratory fitness and speed-agility with overall cortical thickness were mediated by fat mass index (56.86% amp; 62.28%, respectively). In conclusion, cardiorespiratory fitness and speed-agility, but not muscular fitness, are associated with overall cortical thickness, and in turn, thicker brain cortex is associated with higher intelligence in overweight/obese children. Yet, none of the three physical fitness components were related to surface area. Importantly, adiposity may hinder the benefits of cardiorespiratory fitness and speed-agility on cortical thickness. Understanding individual differences in brain morphology may have important implications for educators and policy makers who aim to determine policies and interventions to maximize academic learning and occupational success later in life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE , 2019. Vol. 186, p. 771-781
Keywords [en]
Physical fitness; Cortical thickness; Brain; Cardiorespiratory fitness; Speed-agility; Muscular fitness; Overweight; Children
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154319DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.11.047ISI: 000455968400068PubMedID: 30500426OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-154319DiVA, id: diva2:1285538
Note

Funding Agencies|Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness [DEP2013-47540, DEP2016-79512-R, PSI2012-3929, BES-2014-068829]; Alicia Kolplowitz Foundation; Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation [RYC-2011-09011, FJCI-2014-19563]; Alicia Koplowitz Foundation; Jose Castillejo scholarship [CAS17/00320]; Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport [FPU14/06837, FPU15/02645]; Strategic Research Area Health Care Science, Karolinska Institutet/Umea University; Catalan Government, Spain [SLT006/17/00236]; Junta de Andalucia [P10-HUM-6635]; University of Granada, Plan Propio de Investigacion 2016, Excellence action: Units of Excellence; University of Granada, Plan Propio de Investigacion 2016, Excellence action: Unit of Excellence on Exercise and Health (UCEES); EXERNET Research Network on Exercise and Health in Special Populations [DEP2005-00046/ACTI]; EXERNET Research Network on Exercise and Health in Special Populations (SAMID III network); EXERNET Research Network on Exercise and Health in Special Populations (RETICS - PN I+D+I 2017-2021 (Spain)); ISCIII- Sub-Directorate General for Research Assessment and Promotion; European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) [RD16/0022]

Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-06-28

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Henriksson, Pontus
By organisation
Division of Community MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
In the same journal
NeuroImage
Geriatrics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 51 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf