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Market forces in Swedish education
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. (Vuxenpedagogik och Folkbildning)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9916-8705
2019 (English)In: Neoliberalism and market forces in education: Lessons from Sweden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt & Andreas Fejes, Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The shift towards neoliberalism in education in Sweden connects up with wider agendas promoted by influential transnational actors such as the OECD and the EU. Sweden has been quite involved in OECD activities and is part of the major assessment programme, and even though the EU does not have any mandate in terms of educational policies, its agenda on lifelong learning has been picked up and mobilised in a Swedish context. Such a lifelong learning agenda is shaped within a wider neoliberal notion of governing. Here education is seen as an investment whose rewards can be evaluated in terms of increased growth and international competitiveness. As such, the focus of education has been directed towards employability. Competitiveness thus emerges as the more or less overall objective of education to strive for. The meaning and role of education thereby changes, from being seen as a fundamental social right to being seen as a commodity, a product on the market offered to individuals in their search for skills and competences considered necessary. Such changing views of education also change the way the role of public institutions is seen – from one of planning, organising and delivering services, to one that follows up and evaluates the services provided. How did Sweden end up here? What made such developments possible? This chapter begins to answer those questions, which are then further elaborated on in the following chapters in the book.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019, 1. p. 1-12
Series
Routledge Research in Education Policy and Politics
Keywords [en]
Marketisation, Education, Sweden, Neoliberalism
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155057ISBN: 9781138600881 (print)ISBN: 9780429470530 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-155057DiVA, id: diva2:1295472
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved

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Dahlstedt, MagnusFejes, Andreas

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf