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The Ronnie Gardiner Method: An Innovative Music-Based Intervention for Neurological Rehabilitation - Theoretical Background and Contemporary Research with Focus on Parkinson`s Disease
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.ORCID iD: 000-0002-3447-6547
2018 (English)In: Neurophysiology and Rehabilitation, ISSN 2641-8991, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 32-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Ronnie Gardiner Method (RGM) is an innovative, practitioner-led, music-based intervention using sensorimotor and cognitive integration. RGM was originally developed by the Swedish musician Ronnie Gardiner. Since 2010, RGM has been successfully implemented within neurorehabilitation in many countries. The purpose of this article is to outline some of the theoretical assumptions underpinning the potential benefits from this intervention, using Parkinson’s disease as an example. RGM is based on principles of neuroplasticity, motor learning, and postural control, and uses energizing, beat-based music to provide multisensory input (visual, audio, kinetic, and tactile) in order to stimulate experience-dependent neuroplastic processes. It aims at stimulating cognitive and motor function (e.g., memory, concentration, executive function, multitasking, coordination, mobility, balance, and motor skills). In addition, it may aid body awareness, self-esteem, and social skills. RGM has been scientifically evaluated as a means of multimodal sensory stimulation after stroke and as a means of improving mobility and cognitive function in Parkinson’s disease. RGM is a complex multi-task intervention with the potential to be beneficial in different settings and in different neurological conditions. It can be performed either while standing up or sitting down and can be practiced with the advantages gained as a group activity or individually, which makes it very flexible. It is currently being used as rehabilitation activity for people with stroke, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, dementia, and depression. Furthermore, RGM is used in programs targeting healthy aging, ADHD, autism, and dyslexia, and in ordinary school environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edelweiss Publications , 2018. Vol. 1, no 1, p. 32-37
Keywords [en]
Parkinsons disease, Neuroplasticity, Multiple sclerosis, Stroke, Autism, Dementia, Dyslexia
National Category
Health Sciences Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155774OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-155774DiVA, id: diva2:1299228
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
Language
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Output format
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