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Health-related quality of life worsens by school age amongst children with food allergy
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: Clinical and Translational Allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, E-ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 9, article id 10Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Food allergy is negatively associated with health-related quality of life (HRQL). Although differences exist between parents and children, less is known about age-specific differences amongst children. As such, we aimed to identify if age, as well as other factors, are associated with food allergy-specific HRQL in an objectively defined population of children. Methods: Overall, 63 children (boys: n = 36; 57.1%) with specialist-diagnosed food allergy to 1 + foods were included. Parents/guardians completed the Swedish version of a disease-specific questionnaire designed to assess overall-and domain-specific HRQL. Descriptive statistics and linear regression were used. Results: The most common food allergy was hens egg (n = 40/63; 63.5%). Most children had more than one food allergy (n = 48; 76.2%). Nearly all had experienced mild symptoms (e.g. skin; n = 56/63; 94.9%), and more than half had severe symptoms (e.g. respiratory; 39/63; 66.1%). Compared to young children (0-5 years), older children (6-12 years) had worse HRQL (e.g. overall HRQL: B = 0.60; 95% CI 0.05-1.16; p amp;lt; 0.04.). Similarly, multiple food allergies, and severe symptoms were significantly associated with worse HRQL (all p amp;lt; 0.05) even in models adjusted for concomitant allergic disease. No associations were found for gender or socioeconomic status. Conclusion: Older children and those with severe food allergy have worse HRQL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC , 2019. Vol. 9, article id 10
Keywords [en]
Children; Food allergy; Food hypersensitivity; Health-related quality of life
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155938DOI: 10.1186/s13601-019-0244-0ISI: 000460909700001PubMedID: 30774928OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-155938DiVA, id: diva2:1301274
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedens Asthma and Allergy Research Foundation [F2015-0042, F2015-0004]; Centre for Allergy Research at Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm); Karin and Sten Mortstedt Initiative on Anaphylaxis; Allergy Center, University Hospital, (Linkoping)

Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-04-01

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