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Characteristics of Bone-Conduction Devices Simulated in a Finite-Element Model of a Whole Human Head
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3350-8997
2019 (English)In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 23, article id 2331216519836053Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nowadays, many different kinds of bone-conduction devices (BCDs) are available for hearing rehabilitation. Most studies of these devices fail to compare the different types of BCDs under the same conditions. Moreover, most results are between two BCDs in the same subject, or two BCDs in different subjects failing to provide an overview of the results between several of the BCDs. Another issue is that some BCDs require surgical procedures that prevent comparison of the BCDs in the same persons. In this study, four types of skin-drive BCDs, three direct-drive BCDs, and one oral device were evaluated in a finite-element model of the human head that was able to simulate all BCDs under the same conditions. The evaluation was conducted using both a dynamic force as input and an electric voltage to a model of a BCD vibrator unit. The results showed that the direct-drive BCDs and the oral device gave vibration responses within 10 dB at the cochlea. The skin-drive BCDs had similar or even better cochlear vibration responses than the direct-drive BCDs at low frequencies, but the direct-drive BCDs gave up to 30 dB higher cochlear vibration responses at high frequencies. The study also investigated the mechanical point impedance at the interface between the BCD and the head, providing information that explains some of the differences seen in the results. For example, when the skin-drive BCD attachment area becomes too small, the transducer cannot provide an output force similar to the devices with larger attachment surfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC , 2019. Vol. 23, article id 2331216519836053
Keywords [en]
bone conduction; bone-conducted sound; finite-element model; bone-conduction devices; human head
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155936DOI: 10.1177/2331216519836053ISI: 000461651800001PubMedID: 30880644OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-155936DiVA, id: diva2:1301299
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [VR 621-2013-6048]; Stiftelsen Promobilia

Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-04-01

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Citation style
  • apa
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