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Sleep deprivation differentially affects subcomponents of cognitive control
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Oslo, Norway.
Univ Oslo, Norway.
Univ Oslo, Norway.
Univ Oslo, Norway.
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2019 (English)In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 42, no 4, article id zsz016Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Objectives

Although sleep deprivation has long been known to negatively affect cognitive performance, the exact mechanisms through which it acts and what cognitive domains are affected most is still disputed. The current study provides a theory-driven approach to examine and explain the detrimental effects of sleep loss with a focus on attention and cognitive control.

Methods

Twenty-four participants (12 females; age: 24 ± 3 years) completed the experiment that involved laboratory-controlled over-night sleep deprivation and two control conditions, namely, a normally rested night at home and a night of sleep in the laboratory. Using a stop signal task in combination with electroencephalographic recordings, we dissociated different processes contributing to task performance such as sustained attention, automatic or bottom-up processing, and strategic or top-down control. At the behavioral level, we extracted reaction times, response accuracy, and markers of behavioral adjustments (post-error and post-stop slowing), whereas at the neural level event-related potentials (ERP) found in context of response inhibition (N2/P3) and error monitoring (ERN/Pe) were obtained.

Results

It was found that 24 hr of sleep deprivation resulted in declined sustained attention and reduced P300 and Pe amplitudes, demonstrating a gradual breakdown of top-down control. In contrast, N200 and ERN as well as the stop-signal reaction time showed higher resilience to sleep loss signifying the role of automatic processing.

Conclusions

These results support the notion that sleep deprivation is more detrimental to cognitive functions that are relatively more dependent on mental effort and/or cognitive capacity, as opposed to more automatic control processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Westchester, IL, United States: Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Llc , 2019. Vol. 42, no 4, article id zsz016
Keywords [en]
sleep deprivation; cognitive control; stop signal task; ERP; response inhibition; error monitoring
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157238DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsz016ISI: 000465534300021PubMedID: 30649563Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85064128736OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-157238DiVA, id: diva2:1324205
Note

Funding Agencies|European Unions Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme [720270]

Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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