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Multiple antibiotic resistance as a risk factor for mortality and prolonged hospital stay: A cohort study among neonatal intensive care patients with hospital-acquired infections caused by gram-negative bacteria in Vietnam
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0215666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Antibiotic resistance (ABR) is an increasing burden for global health. The prevalence of ABR in Southeast Asia is among the highest worldwide, especially in relation to hospital acquired infections (HAI) in intensive care units (ICU). However, little is known about morbidity and mortality attributable to ABR in neonates. Aim This study aimed to assess mortality and the length of hospitalization attributable to ABR in gram-negative bacteria (GNB) causing HAI in a Vietnamese neonatal ICU (NICU). Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study (n = 296) in a NICU in Hanoi, Vietnam, from March 2016 to October 2017. Patients isolated with HAI caused by GNB were included. The exposure was resistance to multiple antibiotic classes, the two outcomes were mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS). Data were analysed using two regression models, controlling for confounders and effect modifiers such as co-morbidities, time at risk, severity of illness, sex, age, and birthweight. Results The overall case fatality rate was 44.3% and the 30 days mortality rate after infection was 31.8%. For every additional resistance to an antibiotic class, the odds of a fatal outcome increased by 27% and LOS increased by 2.1 days. These results were statistically significant (p amp;lt; 0.05). Conclusion ABR was identified as a significant risk factor for adverse outcomes in neonates with HAI. These findings are generally in line with previous research in children and adults. However, heterogeneous study designs, the neglect of important confounders and varying definitions of ABR impair the validity, reliability, and comparability of results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE , 2019. Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0215666
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General Practice
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157526DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0215666ISI: 000467373000015PubMedID: 31067232OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-157526DiVA, id: diva2:1328214
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT); ReAct; Karolinska Institutet; TRAC (Training and Research Academic Collaboration) Sweden-Vietnam

Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-20

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Hanberger, Håkan
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Division of Microbiology, Infection and InflammationFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Infectious Diseases
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  • apa
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