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Body composition and growth in full-term small for gestational age and large for gestational age Swedish infants assessed with air displacement plethysmography at birth and at 3-4 months of age
Lund Univ, Sweden.
Lund Univ, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
Lund Univ, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0207978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Being born small for gestational age (SGA) or large for gestational age (LGA) has short and long term metabolic consequences. There is a growing interest in the extent to which body composition, both in the short and the long term, differs in infants born at the extremes of these birth weights. Methods Body composition in 25 SGA and 25 LGA infants were assessed during the first days of life and at 3-4 months of age using air displacement plethysmography. Results SGA infants had significantly lower body fat (%) at birth compared to LGA infants. SGA infants increased their body weight and length at a significantly higher rate between birth and 3-4 months than LGA infants. Fat mass (g) in SGA infants increased 23 times between birth and 3-4 months of age compared to 2.8 times for LGA infants. At 3-4 months of age LGA infants reached a threshold in body fat (%) while SGA infants were still gaining body fat (%). Conclusion Several significant differences have been identified between SGA and LGA infants, indicating that the effects of intrauterine life continues to play an important role in body composition and growth during the first 3-4 months of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE , 2019. Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0207978
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Pediatrics
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158338DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0207978ISI: 000467949100002PubMedID: 31091240OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-158338DiVA, id: diva2:1333858
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland; Faculty of Medicine at Lund University

Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-07-02

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Törnqvist, Caroline
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Division of Children's and Women's healthFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesH.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus
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