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Conducting-Polymer Bolometers for Low-Cost IR-Detection Systems
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7016-6514
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2019 (English)In: ADVANCED ELECTRONIC MATERIALS, ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 5, no 6, article id 1800975Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Semiconducting polymers are promising materials for manufacturing optoelectronic devices, such as large-area solar cells or small light-emitting diodes, through the use of printing technologies. In their oxidized form, pi-conjugated polymers become good electrical conductors and their optical absorption shifts to the infrared region. It is demonstrated that conducting polymers can be integrated in bolometers for IR detection. A bolometer is a thermally isolated thin device that absorbs IR radiation and translates a temperature change into a change in electrical resistance. While commercial bolometers are usually made of complex architectures comprising several materials (that is, an IR absorbing layer, a conducting layer, and a thermally insulating layer), the first polymer bolometer is demonstrated with a freestanding layer of poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene) having high IR absorption, low thermal conductivity, and good thermistor action in one single layer. The solution processability of conducting polymers, their compatibility with high-resolution printing technologies, and their unique combination of optoelectronic properties can lead to a breakthrough for low-cost uncooled IR cameras, which are in high demand for security and safety applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2019. Vol. 5, no 6, article id 1800975
Keywords [en]
conducting polymers; IR detection; low-cost thermal imaging; organic bolometers; PEDOT; PSS
National Category
Other Materials Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158895DOI: 10.1002/aelm.201800975ISI: 000471049100010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85065330076OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-158895DiVA, id: diva2:1337569
Note

Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (Tail of the Sun); Swedish Energy Agency; Swedish Research Council; AForsk; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU) [2009 00971]; U.S. National Science Foundation [DMR-1262261]

Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved

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