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Are Friends of My Friends Too Social? Limitations of Location Privacy in a Socially-Connected World
NYU, NY 11201 USA.
Univ Arizona, AZ USA.
Univ Arizona, AZ USA.
SUNY Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
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2018 (English)In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2018 THE NINETEENTH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKING AND COMPUTING (MOBIHOC 18), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2018, p. 280-289Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With the ubiquitous adoption of smartphones and mobile devices, it is now common practice for ones location to be sensed, collected and likely shared through social platforms. While such data can be helpful for many applications, users start to be aware of the privacy issue in handling location and trajectory data. While some users may voluntarily share their location information (e.g., for receiving location-based services, or for crowdsourcing systems), their location information may lead to information leaks about the whereabouts of other users, through the co-location of events when two users are at the same location at the same time and other side information, such as upper bounds of movement speed. It is therefore crucial to understand how much information one can derive about others positions through the co-location of events and occasional GPS location leaks of some of the users. In this paper we formulate the problem of inferring locations of mobile agents, present theoretically-proven bounds on the amount of information that could be leaked in this manner, study their geometric nature, and present algorithms matching these bounds. We will show that even if a very weak set of assumptions is made on trajectories patterns, and users are not obliged to follow any reasonable patterns, one could infer very accurate estimation of users locations even if they opt not to share them. Furthermore, this information could be obtained using almost linear-time algorithms, suggesting the practicality of the method even for huge volumes of data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2018. p. 280-289
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158890DOI: 10.1145/3209582.3209611ISI: 000471038600029ISBN: 978-1-4503-5770-8 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-158890DiVA, id: diva2:1337574
Conference
19th ACM International Symposium on Mobile Ad-Hoc Networking and Computing (Mobihoc)
Note

Funding Agencies|National Science Foundation [CCF-11-17336, CCF-12-18791, CCF-15-40656, CCF-1535900, CNS-1618391, DMS-1737812, CNS-1731164, CCF-1526406]; US-Israel Binational Science Foundation [2014/170, 2016/116]; Swedish Transport Administration

Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-07-17

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Polishchuk, Valentin
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Communications and Transport SystemsFaculty of Science & Engineering
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf