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Bidirectional relationship between eating disorders and autoimmune diseases
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden; George Mason Univ, VA 22030 USA.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Kings Coll London, England.
Univ N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 60, no 7, p. 803-812Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Immune system dysfunction may be associated with eating disorders (ED) and could have implications for detection, risk assessment, and treatment of both autoimmune diseases and EDs. However, questions regarding the nature of the relationship between these two disease entities remain. We evaluated the strength of associations for the bidirectional relationships between EDs and autoimmune diseases. Methods In this nationwide population-based study, Swedish registers were linked to establish a cohort of more than 2.5 million individuals born in Sweden between January 1, 1979 and December 31, 2005 and followed up until December 2013. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to investigate: (a) subsequent risk of EDs in individuals with autoimmune diseases; and (b) subsequent risk of autoimmune diseases in individuals with EDs. Results We observed a strong, bidirectional relationship between the two illness classes indicating that diagnosis in one illness class increased the risk of the other. In women, the diagnoses of autoimmune disease increased subsequent hazards of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and other eating disorders (OED). Similarly, AN, BN, and OED increased subsequent hazards of autoimmune diseases.Gastrointestinal-related autoimmune diseases such as, celiac disease and Crohns disease showed a bidirectional relationship with AN and OED. Psoriasis showed a bidirectional relationship with OED. The previous occurence of type 1 diabetes increased the risk for AN, BN, and OED. In men, we did not observe a bidirectional pattern, but prior autoimmune arthritis increased the risk for OED. Conclusions The interactions between EDs and autoimmune diseases support the previously reported associations. The bidirectional risk pattern observed in women suggests either a shared mechanism or a third mediating variable contributing to the association of these illnesses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2019. Vol. 60, no 7, p. 803-812
Keywords [en]
hazard; risk; immune system; cox regression; anorexia nervosa; bulimia nervosa; autoimmunity
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158948DOI: 10.1111/jcpp.12958ISI: 000472977400010PubMedID: 30178543OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-158948DiVA, id: diva2:1338181
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [538-2013-8864]; Anorexia Nervosa Genetics Initiative (ANGI), an initiative of the Klarman Family Foundation; National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship [1000183151]; Swedish Research Council through the Swedish Initiative for Research on Microdata in the Social And Medical Sciences (SIMSAM) [340-2013-5867]; Stockholm County Council (ALF-projects); Shire; Foundation of Hope: Research and Treatment of Mental Illness

Available from: 2019-07-20 Created: 2019-07-20 Last updated: 2019-07-20

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