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Postural control adaptation to optic flow in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder
Curtin Univ, Australia.
Curtin Univ, Australia.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia.
Curtin Univ, Australia.
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2019 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 72, p. 175-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sensory reweighting is important for humans to flexibly up-weigh and down-weigh sensory information in dynamic environments. There is an element of time involved in the sensory reweighting process. A longer time spent on sensory reweighting may increase the destabilizing effect of postural control. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are reported to have poor postural control. It is uncertain if a different sensory reweighting process underlies the postural control deficit in children and adults with ASD. Research question: To explore the sensory reweighting capability in ASD, the present study examined whether the temporal domains of postural control differed in children and adults, with and without ASD under various optic flow conditions. Methods: Thirty-three children (8-12 years old) and 33 adults (18-50 years old) with and without ASD underwent quiet standing in six radial optic flow conditions. Each condition lasted for 60 s and was shown twice to all participants. For each optic flow condition, changes in postural response within-trial and between-trials were measured. Results: Under various optic flow illusions, both children with and without ASD took a longer time to restore their posture compared with adults with and without ASD. Nonetheless, all groups demonstrated comparable abilities to adjust their posture to one that is close to the baseline position after one exposure to the optic flow stimulation. Significance: The present study showed that the temporal domains of postural control under different optic flow conditions were similar between individuals with and without ASD from the same age group. The ability to down-weigh visual information efficiently comes with the developmental progression of the sensory reweighting system. These findings suggest that the sensory reweighting process does not elucidate the postural control deficits in individuals with ASD and thus alternative explanations to determine the underlying mechanism for postural instability are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD , 2019. Vol. 72, p. 175-181
Keywords [en]
Sensory reweighting; Sensory integration; Habituation; Balance; Developmental
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159897DOI: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2019.06.007ISI: 000478682600026PubMedID: 31220791OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-159897DiVA, id: diva2:1346124
Note

Funding Agencies|Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship; Curtin University Hub for Immersive Visualisation and eResearch; Telethon Kids Institute

Available from: 2019-08-27 Created: 2019-08-27 Last updated: 2019-08-27

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