liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Interfaces in organic electronics
Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9879-3915
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7016-6514
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (Laboratory of Organic Electronics)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2799-3490
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Nature Reviews Materials, E-ISSN 2058-8437Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Undoped, conjugated, organic molecules and polymers possess properties of semiconductors, including the electronic structure and charge transport, which can be readily tuned by chemical design. Moreover, organic semiconductors (OSs) can be n-doped or p-doped to become organic conductors and can exhibit mixed electronic and ionic conductivity. Compared with inorganic semiconductors and metals, organic (semi)conductors possess a unique feature: no insulating oxide forms on their surface when exposed to air. Thus, OSs form clean interfaces with many materials, including metals and other OSs. OS–metal and OS–OS interfaces have been intensely investigated over the past 30 years, from which a consistent theoretical description has emerged. Since the 2000s, increased attention has been paid to interfaces in organic electronics that involve dielectrics, electrolytes, ferroelectrics and even biological organisms. In this Review, we consider the central role of these interfaces in the function of organic electronic devices and discuss how the physico-chemical properties of the interfaces govern the interfacial transport of light, excitons, electrons and ions, as well as the transduction of electrons into the molecular language of cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019.
National Category
Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160114DOI: 10.1038/s41578-019-0127-yScopus ID: 2-s2.0-85069828729OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-160114DiVA, id: diva2:1348922
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Fahlman, MatsFabiano, SimoneGueskine, ViktorSimon, Daniel TBerggren, MagnusCrispin, Xavier

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fahlman, MatsFabiano, SimoneGueskine, ViktorSimon, Daniel TBerggren, MagnusCrispin, Xavier
By organisation
Faculty of Science & EngineeringLaboratory of Organic Electronics
Condensed Matter Physics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 12 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf