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From Green Revolution to Green Evolution: A Critique of the Political Myth of Averted Famine
Univ Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
2019 (English)In: Minerva, ISSN 0026-4695, E-ISSN 1573-1871, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 265-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper critiques the so-called "Green Revolution" as a political myth of averted famine. A "political myth," among other functions, reflects a narrative structure that characterizes understandings of causality between policy action and outcome. As such, the details of a particular political myth elevate certain policy options (and families of policy options) over others. One important narrative strand of the political myths of the Green Revolution is a story of averted famine: in the 1950s and 1960s, scientists predicted a global crisis to emerge in the 1970s and beyond, created by a rapidly growing global population that would cause global famine as food supplies would not keep up with demand. The narrative posits that an intense period of technological innovation in agricultural productivity led to increasing crop yields which led to more food being produced, and the predicted crisis thus being averted. The fact that the world did not experience a global famine in the 1970s is cited as evidence in support of the narrative. Political myths need not necessarily be supported by evidence, but to the extent that they shape understandings of cause and effect in policymaking, political myths which are not grounded in evidence risk misleading policymakers and the public. We argue a political myth of the Green Revolution focused on averted famine is not well grounded in evidence and thus has potential to mislead to the extent it guides thinking and action related to technological innovation. We recommend an alternative narrative: The Green Evolution, in which sustainable improvements in agricultural productivity did not necessarily avert a global famine, but nonetheless profoundly shaped the modern world. More broadly, we argue that one of the key functions of the practice of technology assessment is to critique and to help create the political myths that preserve an evidence-grounded basis for connecting the cause and effect of policy action and practical outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER , 2019. Vol. 57, no 3, p. 265-291
Keywords [en]
Green revolution; Political myth; Technology assessment
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160605DOI: 10.1007/s11024-019-09372-7ISI: 000485017600001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-160605DiVA, id: diva2:1362707
Note

Funding Agencies|Linkoping University

Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-10-21

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Linnér, Björn-Ola
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Tema Environmental ChangeFaculty of Arts and SciencesCentre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR
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