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PAX5 is part of a functional transcription factor network targeted in lymphoid leukemia
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Lund Univ, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Lund Univ, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
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2019 (English)In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 15, no 8, article id e1008280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the most frequently mutated proteins in human B-lineage leukemia is the transcription factor PAX5. These mutations often result in partial rather than complete loss of function of the transcription factor. While the functional dose of PAX5 has a clear connection to human malignancy, there is limited evidence for that heterozygote loss of PAX5 have a dramatic effect on the development and function of B-cell progenitors. One possible explanation comes from the finding that PAX5 mutated B-ALL often display complex karyotypes and additional mutations. Thus, PAX5 might be one component of a larger transcription factor network targeted in B-ALL. To investigate the functional network associated with PAX5 we used BioID technology to isolate proteins associated with this transcription factor in the living cell. This identified 239 proteins out of which several could be found mutated in human B-ALL. Most prominently we identified the commonly mutated IKZF1 and RUNX1, involved in the formation of ETV6-AML1 fusion protein, among the interaction partners. ChIP- as well as PLAC-seq analysis supported the idea that these factors share a multitude of target genes in human B-ALL cells. Gene expression analysis of mouse models and primary human leukemia suggested that reduced function of PAX5 increased the ability of an oncogenic form of IKZF1 or ETV6-AML to modulate gene expression. Our data reveals that PAX5 belong to a regulatory network frequently targeted by multiple mutations in B-ALL shedding light on the molecular interplay in leukemia cells. Author summary The use of modern high throughput DNA-sequencing has dramatically increased our ability to identify genetic alterations associated with cancer. However, while the mutations per se are rather easily identified, our understanding of how these mutations impact cellular functions and drive malignant transformation is more limited. We have explored the function of the transcription factor PAX5, commonly mutated in human B-lymphocyte leukemia, to identify a regulatory network of transcription factors often targeted in human disease. Hence, we propose that malignant conversion of B-lymphocyte progenitors involves multiple targeting of a central transcription factor network aggravating the impact of the individual mutations. These data increase our understanding for how individual mutations collaborate to drive the formation of B-lineage leukemia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE , 2019. Vol. 15, no 8, article id e1008280
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Medical Genetics
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161204DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1008280ISI: 000486222200018PubMedID: 31381561OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161204DiVA, id: diva2:1365670
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Cancer Society; Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council; Linkoping University; Lions forskningsfond; Japan Society for promotion of science (JSPS)Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT)Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-12-10

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