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Addressing alcohol in routine healthcare in Sweden-population-based surveys in 2010 and 2017
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0279-5903
Newcastle Univ, England.
Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Operations management Region Östergötland, Research and Development Unit.
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 748-753Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The aim of the study was to compare how alcohol was addressed in routine healthcare practice in Sweden in 2010 and 2017, following the 2011 implementation of national drinking guidelines.

Methods

Population-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 2010 and in 2017. Subjects were 3200 respondents in 2010 (response rate 54%) and 3000 respondents in 2017 (response rate 51%) in Sweden. Both the 2010 and 2017 surveys collected data on: socio-demographics; alcohol consumption; healthcare visits in the past 12 months and characteristics of alcohol conversations in healthcare (duration, contents, experience and effects).

Results

It was significantly more likely that respondents had a conversation about alcohol in healthcare in 2017 than in 2010 (OR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.27–1.75; P<0.001). Conversations about alcohol in the healthcare were mostly short (<4 min), both in 2010 and 2017. The alcohol conversations in 2017 included less information about alcohol’s influence on health (P = 0.002) compared with 2010. The experience of the conversation about alcohol was perceived as less dramatic in 2017 than in 2010 (P = 0.038).

Conclusions

The results suggest that conversations about alcohol were more embedded in routine healthcare practice in Sweden in 2017 than in 2010. This development has occurred since the 2011 publication of the national guidelines. Alcohol conversations targeted also specific groups of drinkers as recommended by the guidelines. However, our study design does not allow for conclusions about the relationship between the guidelines and the changes in healthcare practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019. Vol. 29, no 4, p. 748-753
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161203DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckz057ISI: 000486966400025PubMedID: 31348833Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85070818784OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161203DiVA, id: diva2:1365672
Note

Funding Agencies|Linkoping University

Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved

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Karlsson, NadineSkagerström, JannaNilsen, Per
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