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Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and antibiotic consumption results from 16 hospitals in Viet Nam: The VINARES project 2012-2013
Univ Oxford, Vietnam.
Univ Oxford, Vietnam.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance, ISSN 2213-7165, E-ISSN 2213-7173, Vol. 18, p. 269-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To establish a hospital-based surveillance network with national coverage for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and antibiotic consumption in Viet Nam. Methods: A 16-hospital network (Viet Nam Resistance: VINARES) was established and consisted of national and provincial-level hospitals across the country. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing results from routine clinical diagnostic specimens and antibiotic consumption data in Defined Daily Dose per 1000 bed days (DDD/1000 patient-days) were prospectively collected and analysed between October 2012 and September 2013. Results: Data from a total of 24 732 de-duplicated clinical isolates were reported. The most common bacteria were: Escherichia coli (4437 isolates, 18%), Klebsiella spp. (3290 isolates, 13%) and Acinetobacter spp. (2895 isolates, 12%). The hospital average antibiotic consumption was 918 DDD/1000 patient-days. Third-generation cephalosporins were the most frequently used antibiotic class (223 DDD/1000 patient-days, 24%), followed by fluoroquinolones (151 DDD/1000 patient-days, 16%) and second-generation cephalosporins (112 DDD/1000 patient-days, 12%). Proportions of antibiotic resistance were high: 1098/1580 (69%) Staphylococcus aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant (MRSA); 115/344 isolates (33%) and 90/358 (25%) Streptococcus pneumoniae had reduced susceptibility to penicillin and ceftriaxone, respectively. A total of 180/2977 (6%) E. coli and 242/1526 (16%) Klebsiella pneumoniae were resistant to imipenem, respectively; 602/1826 (33%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa were resistant to ceftazidime and 578/1765 (33%) to imipenem. Of Acinetobacter spp. 1495/2138 (70%) were resistant to carbapenems and 2/333 (1%) to colistin. Conclusions: These data are valuable in providing a baseline for AMR among common bacterial pathogens in Vietnamese hospitals and to assess the impact of interventions. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of International Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD , 2019. Vol. 18, p. 269-278
Keywords [en]
Antimicrobial resistance; Surveillance; Defined daily dose (DDD)/1000 patient-days; Hospital-based surveillance; Viet Nam
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161196DOI: 10.1016/j.jgar.2019.06.002ISI: 000485661700055PubMedID: 31201995OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161196DiVA, id: diva2:1365685
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA); Wellcome Trust of Great BritainWellcome Trust; Linkoping University (Sweden); Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership (GARP)

Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-10-25

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Rydell, UlfNilsson, Lennart EHanberger, Håkan
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Division of Microbiology and Molecular MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDivision of Microbiology, Infection and InflammationDepartment of Infectious Diseases
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