liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Influence of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Circulating Immune Response Cell Numbers and Phenotypes of Patients With Breast Cancer
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
Ryhov Hosp, Sweden; Naresuan Univ, Thailand.
Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 4957-4963Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aim: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) damages multiple layers of skin, muscle, blood vessels and blood cells that are included within the RT area. Indirect, bystander systemic effects could also develop in cells not directly hit by radiation. Materials and Methods: Ninety-three female patients recovering from breast cancer surgery and 82 female healthy blood donors were analyzed. For identification of systemic adaptive and innate immune response, rapid and low-cost blood-based biomarkers were assayed. Results: Post-operated breast cancer patients had a decreased number of circulating adaptive immune response cells but increased number of circulating immunosuppressive myeloid subpopulations. RT decreased the number of T-cells and platelets without influencing the number of immunosuppressive myeloid subpopulations. Alterations in the number and phenotypes of T-cell subpopulations were associated with SNPs. Conclusion: The combination of RT and immunotherapy might provide optimal treatment for cancer patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INT INST ANTICANCER RESEARCH , 2019. Vol. 39, no 9, p. 4957-4963
Keywords [en]
Breast cancer; radiotherapy; blood-based biomarkers
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161187DOI: 10.21873/anticanres.13684ISI: 000486457600047PubMedID: 31519601OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161187DiVA, id: diva2:1365696
Note

Funding Agencies|Jonkoping Clinical Cancer Research Foundation [110426-1]; Futurum [144631]; FORSS [567001]; Thai Office of Science and Technology in Brussels, Ministry of Science and Technology

Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-10-25

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lewin, NongnitOliva, DelmyAndersson, Bengt-Åke
By organisation
Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and OncologyFaculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
In the same journal
Anticancer Research
Cancer and Oncology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 9 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf