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Elucidating the putative link between prefrontal neurotransmission, functional connectivity, and affective symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7809-2481
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 13590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Altered neural mechanisms are well-acknowledged in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a disorder of brain-gut-communication highly comorbid with anxiety and depression. As a key hub in corticolimbic inhibition, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) may be involved in disturbed emotion regulation in IBS. However, aberrant mPFC excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission potentially contributing to psychological symptoms in IBS remains unknown. Using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (qMRS), we compared mPFC glutamate + glutamine (Glx) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA+) concentrations in 64 women with IBS and 32 age-matched healthy women (HCs) and investigated their association with anxiety and depression in correlational and subgroup analyses. Applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we explored whether altered neurotransmission was paralleled by aberrant mPFC resting-state functional connectivity (FC). IBS patients did not differ from HCs with respect to mPFC GABA+ or Glx levels. Anxiety was positively associated with mPFC GABA+ concentrations in IBS, whereas Glx was unrelated to psychological or gastrointestinal symptoms. Subgroup comparisons of patients with high or low anxiety symptom severity and HCs revealed increased GABA+ in patients with high symptom severity, and lower mPFC FC with adjacent anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a crucial region of emotion modulation. Our findings provide novel evidence that altered prefrontal inhibitory neurotransmission may be linked to anxiety in IBS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019. Vol. 9, article id 13590
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161143DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-50024-3ISI: 000486568400025PubMedID: 31537890Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85072391526OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161143DiVA, id: diva2:1365787
Note

Funding Agencies|Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH (NIH)United States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [P41-RR14075, R01 RR16594-01A1, R01 NS052585-01]; Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatric Research Program, Cambridge Health Alliance (NIH) [K08 MH01573, K01 MH01798]; County Council of Ostergotland; AFA research foundation; Bengt-Ihre fund; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation)German Research Foundation (DFG) [IC 81/1-1, 316803389 - SFB 1280]; Kurt and Helena Widens Research Fund; Seeing Organ Function project - Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; NIHUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [P41 015909, R01 016089]

Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Witt, Suzanne Tyson

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Icenhour, AdrianeTapper, SofieBednarska, OlgaWitt, Suzanne TysonTisell, AndersLundberg, PeterWalter, Susanna
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Division of Neuro and Inflammation ScienceFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesCenter for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV)Division of Radiological SciencesDepartment of GastroentorologyMedical radiation physics
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