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The effect of paternalistic alternatives on attitudes toward default nudges
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Queen Mary University of London, London, UK; Klagenfurt University, Klagenfurt, Austria.
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8159-1249
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2019 (English)In: Behavioural Public Policy, ISSN 2398-0648Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Nudges are increasingly being proposed and used as a policy tool around the world. The success of nudges depends on public acceptance. However, several questions about what makes a nudge acceptable remain unanswered. In this paper, we examine whether policy alternatives to nudges influence the public's acceptance of these nudges: Do attitudes change when the nudge is presented alongside either a more paternalistic policy alternative (legislation) or a less paternalistic alternative (no behavioral intervention)? In two separate samples drawn from the Swedish general public, we find a very small effect of alternatives on the acceptability of various default nudges overall. Surprisingly, we find that when the alternative to the nudge is legislation, acceptance decreases and perceived intrusiveness increases (relative to conditions where the alternative is no regulation). An implication of this finding is that acceptance of nudges may not always automatically increase when nudges are explicitly compared to more paternalistic alternatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2019.
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161462DOI: 10.1017/bpp.2019.17OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161462DiVA, id: diva2:1367219
Available from: 2019-11-01 Created: 2019-11-01 Last updated: 2019-11-07Bibliographically approved

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Hagman, WilliamErlandsson, ArvidTinghög, GustavVästfjäll, Daniel

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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