liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Elite football teams that do not have a winter break lose on average 303 player-days more per season to injuries than those teams that do: a comparison among 35 professional European teams
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Med Hosp, Qatar.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
FIFA Med Ctr Excellence, England. (Football Res Grp, Linkoping)
2019 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 53, no 19, p. 1231-1235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective To compare injury rates among professional mens football teams that have a winter break in their league season schedule with corresponding rates in teams that do not. Methods 56 football teams from 15 European countries were prospectively followed for seven seasons (2010/2011-2016/2017)-a total of 155 team-seasons. Individual training, match exposure and time-loss injuries were registered. Four different injury rates were analysed over four periods within the season, and linear regression was performed on team-level data to analyse the effect of winter break on each of the injury rates. Crude analyses and analyses adjusted for climatic region were performed. Results 9660 injuries were reported during 1 447 011 exposure hours. English teams had no winter break scheduled in the season calendar: the other European teams had a mean winter break scheduled for 10.0 days. Teams without a winter break lost on average 303 days more per season due to injuries than teams with a winter break during the whole season (pamp;lt;0.001). The results were similar across the three periods August-December (p=0.013), January-March (pamp;lt;0.001) and April-May (p=0.050). Teams without a winter break also had a higher incidence of severe injuries than teams with a winter break during the whole season (2.1 severe injuries more per season for teams without a winter break, p=0.002), as well as during the period JanuaryMarch (p=0.003). A winter break was not associated with higher team training attendance or team match availability. Climatic region was also associated with injury rates. Conclusions The absence of a scheduled winter break was associated with a higher injury burden, both before and during the two periods following the time that many European teams take a winter break. Teams without a winter break (English clubs) had a higher incidence of severe injuries following the time of the year that other teams (other European clubs) had their scheduled break.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP , 2019. Vol. 53, no 19, p. 1231-1235
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161409DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099506ISI: 000489253100011PubMedID: 30442720OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161409DiVA, id: diva2:1367436
Note

Funding Agencies|UEFA; Swedish Football Association; Swedish Research Council for Sport Science

Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-11-04

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ekstrand, JanSpreco, Armin
By organisation
Division of Community MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDivision of Health Care Analysis
In the same journal
British Journal of Sports Medicine
Sport and Fitness Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 7 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf