liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Underestimated Health Inequalities Among Older People-A Consequence of Excluding the Most Disabled and Disadvantaged
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 74, no 8, p. E125-E134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The present study analyzed whether estimates of health inequalities in old age are sensitive to the exclusion of people living in institutions and nonuse of proxy interviews. Method: Pooled data from the 2004 wave (n = 1,180, aged 69-100, primarily interviewed over the phone) and the 2011 wave (n = 931, aged 76-101, primarily interviewed face-to-face) of the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old were used to compare absolute and relative differences in disability and mortality between people with compulsory education and people with more than compulsory education. Results: Both absolute and relative health inequalities would have been underestimated in a survey that excluded institutionalized people and proxy-interviewed community dwellers. The same patterns were found in men and women and regardless of the mode of data collection (telephone or face-to-face interview). The degree of underestimation was lower in those 85 years and older than in those 69 to 84 years. Discussion: A survey that only includes people who live in the community and can participate without the help of a proxy might give the impression that those with low levels of education have less extensive health disadvantages than they actually have.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC , 2019. Vol. 74, no 8, p. E125-E134
Keywords [en]
Education; Mortality; Survey design; Systematic nonparticipation
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161598DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gbx032ISI: 000491242100004PubMedID: 28369563OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161598DiVA, id: diva2:1368184
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council for Health Working Life & Welfare (Forte) [dnr 2011-1330]

Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-06

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kelfve, Susanne
By organisation
Division Ageing and Social ChangeFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 2 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf