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Variations in Self-Reported Nausea, Vomiting, and Well-Being During the First 10 Days Postchemotherapy in Women With Breast Cancer
Department of Oncology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
Futurum–the Academy for Healthcare, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, sweden.
Department of Oncology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
2014 (English)In: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1092-1095, E-ISSN 1538-067X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. E32-E36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy experience nausea and vomiting, both common symptoms affecting quality of life. The aim of the current study was to describe how nausea, vomiting, and well-being vary during the first 10 days after chemotherapy in women with breast cancer. A pilot study with a repeated-measurements design was conducted at a Swedish county hospital where 39 women with breast cancer treated with adjuvant chemotherapy were observed. A structured 10-day diary was used for data collection. Of the 39 women in the study, 33 experienced nausea and 6 also experienced vomiting after chemotherapy. Changes in well-being as a result of nausea or vomiting during any part of the day, as well as distress for other reasons, were reported. Well-being also varied among the individuals. The pattern of change in experienced levels of well-being was not homogeneous, nor did it move in any certain direction. The results of this study show that an individualized treatment approach is required to better meet individual women's needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pittsburgh: Oncology Nursing Society , 2014. Vol. 18, no 2, p. E32-E36
National Category
Nursing Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162105DOI: 10.1188/14.CJON.E32-E36OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-162105DiVA, id: diva2:1371233
Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Prediction of side effects from anticancer treatment with the purpose of increasing quality of life
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediction of side effects from anticancer treatment with the purpose of increasing quality of life
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cancer and its treatments can cause a variety of symptoms. Some of these symptoms are related to the disease and others are seen as a consequence of the treatment. Since patients experience side effects to different degrees despite undergoing the same treatment, it is hypothesized that there is a genetic factor. The individual variation that exists between different patients regarding nausea triggered by chemotherapy, radiotherapy induced skin reactions as well as sleep disorders associated with cancer could partly be explained by genetic differences. We have in these studies confirmed these individual differences. Previous nursing research has mainly focused on the symptoms themselves. The focus in this thesis are the following three main symptoms; nausea and vomiting related to chemotherapy, acute skin inflammation following radiotherapy and sleep problems associated with cancer diagnosis and -treatment.

The aim of this thesis was to find biological markers that can identify the risk of and/or protective factors for nausea and/or vomiting (CINV) as well as understand its heterogeneity (Study 1 and 2). It also aimed to understand the individual factors behind acute radiation skin reactions (ARSR) (Study 3) and sleeping disturbances in patients treated for cancer (Study 4), permitting a more individualized care and optimized health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

In Study 1 and 2 the patients themselves had to document in a diary their experience of nausea and vomiting and well-being. Well-being was considered as synonymous with quality of life. We found a variability and heterogeneity of those symptoms (Study 1). Three genetic markers, FAS/CD95, RB1/LPAR6 and CCL2 that could explain the individual differences and assess the risk of chemotherapy-induced nausea were found in Study 2.

Acute radiation skin reactions (ARSR) along with itching and burning sensation associated with radiotherapy (RT) was assessed by the patients themselves (Study 3) with help of the VAS- and RTOG scales, scoring for visible redness. We found two possible genetic markers, XRCC2 and IFNG. Also, individual differences in symptoms behavior were found.

Sleep disturbances were common and were reported with obvious individual differences [1]. For data collection were used a sleep questionnaire, the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS), open ended questions and EORTC QLQ- C30 questionnaire of quality of life. Sleep, which is important for all primary body functions, is often affected in connection with cancer diagnosis and -treatment.

Through collaboration between nursing staff and specialists in basic science, we have found that biological markers can help in creating individualized care. Knowledge of individual variations in the severity of chemo- or radiotherapy-induced side effects is important in order to better personalize the treatment and care, improve the treatment results and alleviate or prevent the side effects of oncological treatments. By linking symptoms to biological markers, it will hopefully be able to increase the patients’ total health-related quality of life, this being the main goal of this thesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2019. p. 93
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1716
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nursing Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162101 (URN)10.3383/diss.diva-162101 (DOI)9789179299569 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-12-12, Originalet, Qulturum, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved

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